Our reviews are based on extensive research and, when possible, hands-on testing. Each time you make a purchase through one of our independently-chosen links, we may earn a commission. Learn more.

The 10 Best Canned, Soft, & Wet Cat Foods of 2024

comments-icon 181 Comments on The 10 Best Canned, Soft, & Wet Cat Foods of 2024
+ 1 more
Avatar photo
Medically reviewed by  JoAnna Pendergrass, DVM
kate
Updated by  Kate Barrington
Share Email Pinterest Linkedin Twitter Facebook
Best Wet Cat Food Feature

Mallory Crusta / Cats.com

The best wet cat food is like a freshly killed mouse in a can. It’s soft, juicy, and delicious while providing all the protein, fat, and micronutrients your cat needs to stay fit and frisky—without excessive carbohydrates or unnecessary additives.

In this guide, you’ll discover the benefits of wet cat food and learn how to make a healthy choice for your cat. We’ve also included in-depth reviews of our favorite recipes.

At a Glance: Top 10 Best Wet Cat Foods to Buy

Clock
2760
hours of
research
Eye
230
brands
vetted
Check
10
features
reviewed
Star
10
top
picks
Overall Best
10.0
Picked by 2 people today!

Smalls Ground Bird Fresh Cat Food

  • Made with a single source of animal protein
  • Easily digestible formula
  • Rich in hydrating moisture
Get 35% Off ENTER "CATS35" TO GET 35% OFF YOUR FIRST ORDER
Runner Up
9.8
Picked by 53 people today!

Open Farm Harvest Chicken Rustic Blend

  • Packed with premium animal protein
  • Low in carbohydrates
  • No artificial additives or preservatives
Get 20% Off ENTER "CATS20" TO GET 20% OFF YOUR FIRST AUTO-SHIP ORDER
Budget Pick
9.8
Picked by 4 people today!

Dave’s Pet Food Naturally Healthy Grain-Free Turkey Formula Canned Food

  • Affordably priced under $0.30/ounce in 12.5-ounce cans
  • Rich in animal-sourced protein
  • Good source of hydrating moisture for cats
Premium Pick
9.7
Picked by 31 people today!

RAWZ 96% Turkey & Turkey Liver Paté

  • Made with turkey as a single source of protein
  • Negligible carbohydrate content
  • Rich in moisture and animal-sourced fat
Best for Weight Loss
9.5
Picked by 2 people today!

Tiki Cat Succulent Chicken Recipe In Chicken Consommé

  • Great for cats who prefer shreds and stew
  • Wide variety of formulas and flavors
  • Free from thickeners or starches
Best for Seniors
9.3
Picked by 31 people today!

Weruva Truluxe Steak Frites Dinner

  • Rich in easily digestible animal protein
  • Good source of hydrating moisture for cats
  • Fairly low carbohydrate content
Best for Sensitive Digestion
9.6
Picked by 31 people today!

Koha Chicken Stew

  • Short list of simple ingredients for digestibility
  • Contains over 50% dry matter protein
  • Rich in moisture to support hydration and digestion
Best for Picky Cats
9.4
Picked by 31 people today!

Caru Classics Turkey Stew

  • Made with a single source of animal protein
  • Rich in hydrating moisture
  • Cats seem to like the flavor and texture
Best Novel Protein
9.4
Picked by 31 people today!

Ziwi Peak Venison Recipe

  • Novel protein source for cats with food allergies
  • High in moisture to support hydration
  • Glucosamine and chondroitin provide joint support
Best for Gravy Lovers
9.2
Picked by 3 people today!

Weruva Cats in the Kitchen Chicken Frick ‘A Zee

  • Made with a single source of animal protein
  • Very high in moisture to support your cat’s hydration
  • Many cats like the gravy-like texture

Why Trust Cats.com

When selecting wet cat foods for testing, I prioritized recipes made primarily with animal ingredients and chose a variety of flavors and textures. My selections were informed by in-depth research into the nutritional value of wet food for cats as well as my own experience having tested hundreds of products with my own cats.

I ordered these products at full price and tested them at home with my two cats, Wessie and Forest. While my cats provided their opinions on taste and general appeal, I performed an in-depth analysis of the product information and made my own observations. I also researched the brands, seeking information about their recall history, manufacturing practices, and general reputation within the cat-lover community.

I also consulted our team of veterinary experts to determine what features to look for in a healthy wet cat food.

Finally, we consulted seven veterinarians to get their professional opinion on what makes great cat food.

Our Veterinary Advisors

Top Picks Explained

We’re constantly updating our recommendations, so the products in this video no longer match our top picks, but the video still offers an in-depth look at some of the brands on this list.

Is Wet Food Better for Cats Than Dry Food?

Veterinarian Dr. Lizzie Youens, BSc, VCSc, MRCVS states that “our domestic pet cats have not altered their physiology much from their wildcat ancestor. Cats are carnivores: they are nutritionally dependent on meat.”

Some types of food are more in line with your cat’s carnivorous needs than others. Across the price spectrum and all varieties, wet food is almost universally lower in plant ingredients, starches, and sugars than kibble.

The high carbohydrate content of dry cat food is hard to nutritionally justify. Some high-carb ingredients are necessary for the extrusion process to work but your cat’s ability to digest and utilize nutrients from plant ingredients is limited. Carnivorous animals like your cat are better physiologically adapted to processing animal products.

It’s also important to understand that cats don’t naturally drink a lot of water—they instinctively prefer to get moisture from their food. Though cats who eat dry food do drink more water than those on moist diets, they nevertheless get less hydration than a wet food-fed cat. Because they take in so much less water, these cats are prone to chronic dehydration and, consequently, feline lower urinary tract disease (FLUTD).

The 10 Best Canned, Soft, & Wet Cat Foods on the Market

#1 Overall Best: Smalls Ground Bird Fresh Cat Food

Small Fresh Ground Bird

  • Made In: United States
  • Guaranteed Protein: 13% Min
  • Age Range: All Life Stages
  • Calories Per Ounce: 40
  • Typical Cost Per Day: $4.00 per day

Smalls is a fresh cat food delivery service that uses human-grade ingredients in protein-rich, low-carb cat recipes. The food is delivered frozen, so you’ll need to thaw the package overnight in the fridge before feeding. Every subscription starts with a sampler pack then rolls into a monthly delivery plan you can customize in your customer account.

Featuring chicken and chicken liver as the top two ingredients, this fresh food is packed with animal protein from a single source. Green beans, kale, and dandelion greens are the only carbohydrate ingredients, and they are easily digestible and rich in nutrients. In addition to being high in protein and low in carbohydrates, this formula is rich in hydrating moisture. It’s also fairly energy-dense to help maintain lean mass.

Overall, this minced chicken recipe is a high-quality source of balanced nutrition for cats in all life stages. If your cat prefers a smoother texture, the food is also available in a pate style marketed as Smooth Bird.

Ingredients

Chicken, Chicken Liver, Green Beans, Water Sufficient for Processing, Dried Yeast, Tricalcium Phosphate, Kale, Magnesium Proteinate, Potassium Chloride, Choline Chloride, Dandelion Greens, Dried Kelp, Taurine, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Cod Liver Oil, Salt, Niacin Supplement, Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Thiamine Mononitrate, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Folic Acid, Sodium Selenite, Biotin.

Ingredients We Liked: Chicken, Chicken Liver, Cod Liver Oil

Ingredients We Didn’t Like: None

Guaranteed Analysis

Crude Protein: 13%
Crude Fat: 8.5%
Crude Fiber: 1.5%
Moisture: 73%

Dry Matter Basis

Protein: 48.15%
Fat: 31.48%
Fiber: 5.56%
Carbs: 14.81%

Caloric Weight Basis

Protein: 34.54%
Fat: 54.84%
Carbs: 10.63%

What We Liked:

  • Made with a single source of animal protein
  • Easily digestible formula
  • Rich in hydrating moisture
  • Very low in carbohydrates

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Only available as a subscription plan
  • No phone support (text and email only)

#2 Best Ethically Sourced: Open Farm Harvest Chicken Rustic Blend

Open farm cat food

  • Made In: United States
  • Guaranteed Protein: 7% min.
  • Age Range: All Life Stages
  • Calories Per Ounce: 30
  • Price Per Ounce: $0.54 per oz
  • Typical Cost Per Day: $3.60 per day

Though relatively new to the pet food industry, Open Farm has quickly become popularespecially among eco-conscious consumers. Open Farm pet food is made from responsibly sourced, human-grade ingredients. The brand’s sourcing policy emphasizes humanely raised poultry and meat, as well as sustainably-harvested wild-caught fish. All their fruits and vegetables are non-GMO.

This chicken-based recipe appears to rely primarily on animal-sourced protein, though it’s hard to say how much beans and legumes like garbanzo beans and lentils contribute to the total crude protein content. As a whole, the food is moderately high in protein, measured at nearly 39% on a dry matter basis, and fairly low in carbohydrates at under 20%.

The food’s dry matter fat content is almost equal to the protein content. At 30 calories per ounce, this recipe is fairly calorie-dense, so follow the feeding recommendations carefully if your cat is prone to weight gain. Overall, if you prefer to support brands that are conscious of their impact on the environment, Open Farm might be a good pick.

Ingredients

Humanely Raised Chicken, Chicken Bone Broth, Pumpkin, Carrots, Spinach, Red Lentils, Agar Agar, Cranberries, Garbanzo Beans (Chickpeas), Chicory Root, Sunflower Oil, Coconut Oil (preserved with mixed tocopherols), Salt, Vitamin A Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Vitamin E Supplement, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Riboflavin Supplement, Biotin, Folic Acid, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Zinc Amino Acid Chelate, Iron Amino Acid Chelate, Copper Amino Acid Chelate, Manganese Amino Acid Chelate, Sodium Selenite, Dried Kelp, Potassium Chloride, Dandelion Greens, Choline Chloride, Taurine, Turmeric.

Ingredients We Liked: Chicken

Ingredients We Didn’t Like: Sunflower Oil, Coconut Oil

Guaranteed Analysis

Crude Protein: 7%
Crude Fat: 6%
Crude Fiber: 2%
Moisture: 82%

Dry Matter Basis

Protein: 38.89%
Fat: 33.33%
Fiber: 11.11%
Carbs: 16.67%

Caloric Weight Basis

Protein: 28.49%
Fat: 59.3%
Carbs: 12.21%

What We Liked:

  • Made from responsibly-humanely raised chicken
  • Animal protein sources are the food’s primary ingredients
  • Free of potentially-harmful artificial colors, flavors, and preservatives
  • Cats tend to love the taste of this food

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Contains some beans and legumes

#3 Budget Pick: Dave’s Pet Food Naturally Healthy Grain-Free Turkey Formula Canned Food

Dave's Pet Food Naturally Healthy Grain-Free Turkey Formula Canned Cat Food

  • Made In: United States
  • Guaranteed Protein: 10% min.
  • Age Range: Adult
  • Calories Per Ounce: 33
  • Price Per Ounce: $0.27 per oz
  • Typical Cost Per Day: $1.64 per day

With many canned foods priced under $0.30 per ounce, Dave’s Pet Food is a popular pick among budget-conscious cat owners. This brand offers a variety of flavors and textures, all in meat-focused formulas rich in hydrating moisture.

This turkey recipe from Dave’s Naturally Healthy line features turkey muscle meat as the primary ingredient. Chicken liver and chicken also contribute to the food’s 45.45% dry matter protein content. While the recipe could benefit from a source of omega-3 fatty acids, it’s still fairly energy-dense and nutritionally balanced.

Unlike many inexpensive canned foods, this formula is free from artificial additives and hard-to-digest beans and legumes Overall, it’s a simple and easily digestible recipe that most cats seem to enjoy.

Ingredients

Turkey, Chicken Broth, Chicken Liver, Chicken, Guar Gum, Sweet Potatoes, Carrots, Agar-Agar, Potassium Chloride, Salt, Minerals (Iron Proteinate, Zinc Proteinate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Sodium Selenite, Potassium Iodide), Choline Chloride, Vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Niacin Supplement, D-Calcium Pantothenate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Folic Acid), Cranberries, Blueberries, Taurine, Dried Squash, Zucchini, Sodium Carbonate.

Ingredients We Liked: Turkey, Chicken Liver, Chicken

Ingredients We Didn’t Like: Guar Gum

Guaranteed Analysis

Crude Protein: 10%
Crude Fat: 5%
Crude Fiber: 1%
Moisture: 78%
Ash: 2.4%

Dry Matter Basis

Protein: 45.45%
Fat: 22.73%
Fiber: 4.55%
Carbs: 16.36%

Caloric Weight Basis

Protein: 38.85%
Fat: 47.17%
Carbs: 13.98%

What We Liked:

  • Affordably priced under $0.30/ounce in 12.5-ounce cans
  • Rich in animal-sourced protein
  • Good source of hydrating moisture for cats
  • Doesn’t contain peas or legumes

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Guar gum may contribute to loose stools in sensitive cats
  • Could benefit from a source of omega-3 fatty acids

#4 Premium Pick: RAWZ 96% Turkey & Turkey Liver Paté

RAWZ 96% Turkey & Turkey Liver Pate Cat Food

  • Made In: Thailand
  • Guaranteed Protein: 9% min.
  • Age Range: All Life Stages
  • Calories Per Ounce: 37
  • Price Per Ounce: $0.53 per oz
  • Typical Cost Per Day: $2.90 per day

The RAWZ brand itself came to fruition after two members of the Scott family suffered life-altering injuries. Jim Scott III established the RAWZ fund in 2015 and launched the accompanying pet food brand. RAWZ donates 100% of their profits to benefit individuals who have experienced spinal cord or traumatic brain injuries. One of the missions they support provides service dogs for these individuals.

This turkey-based canned cat food features a short and simple list of ingredients. It consists of 96% fresh turkey and turkey liver, cooked in turkey broth. It is a single-protein recipe which makes it a solid choice for cats with food allergies or sensitive digestion, and it’s packed with hydrating moisture.

There’s not much to complain about with this cat food, though some reviewers comment that the consistency is drier than other pate-style products. Overall, however, it is a high-protein, high-fat cat food with low carbohydrate content.

Ingredients

Turkey, Turkey Liver, Turkey Broth, Fenugreek Seeds, Dandelion Greens, Taurine, Natural Flavor, Potassium Chloride, Choline Chloride, Magnesium Proteinate, Zinc Proteinate, Iron Proteinate, Niacin Supplement, Vitamin E Supplement, Copper Proteinate, Sodium Selenite, Calcium Iodate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Manganese Proteinate, Vitamin A Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Salt, Biotin, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Folic Acid.

Ingredients We Liked: Turkey, Turkey Liver

Ingredients We Didn’t Like: None

Guaranteed Analysis

Crude Protein: 9%
Crude Fat: 8%
Crude Fiber: 1%
Moisture: 78%

Dry Matter Basis

Protein: 40.91%
Fat: 36.36%
Fiber: 4.55%
Carbs: 18.18%

Caloric Weight Basis

Protein: 27.75%
Fat: 59.91%
Carbs: 12.33%

What We Liked:

  • Made with turkey as a single source of protein
  • Negligible carbohydrate content
  • Rich in moisture and animal-sourced fat

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Some reviewers say the consistency is a little dry

#5 Best for Weight Loss: Tiki Cat Succulent Chicken Recipe in Chicken Consommé

  • Made In: Thailand
  • Guaranteed Protein: 16% min.
  • Age Range: Adult
  • Calories Per Ounce: 25
  • Price Per Ounce: $0.60 per oz
  • Typical Cost Per Day: $5.00 per day

Although pate-style foods are typically more species-appropriate and have lower carbohydrate content than stew-style products, a few companies create stews without starches and thickeners. Tiki Cat is one of those companies. Their foods are manufactured in Thailand, a country known for good food production and safety standards. Tiki Cat has never been recalled and they seem to be popular among picky eaters.

This recipe is strikingly simple—it’s a can of fortified shredded chicken in broth and oil. The recipe consists of chicken, broth, oil, and supplements. We would prefer to see animal-sourced fat over the sunflower seed oil but there are no major red flag ingredients in this recipe.

Like all Tiki Cat foods, it’s low in fat and calories, making it a good option for cats who need to lose weight. It only contains about 25 calories per ounce and the dry matter fat content is only 13%.

Ingredients

Chicken, Chicken Broth, Sunflower Seed Oil, Calcium Lactate, Dicalcium Phosphate, Potassium Chloride, Taurine, Choline Chloride, Salt, Magnesium Sulfate, Ferrous Sulfate, Thiamine Mononitrate (Vitamin B1), Vitamin E Supplement, Niacin (Vitamin B3), Zinc Oxide, Vitamin A Supplement, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Manganous Oxide, Calcium Pantothenate, Copper Amino Acid Chelate, Riboflavin Supplement (Vitamin B2), Sodium Selenite, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (Vitamin B6), Folic Acid, Potassium Iodide, Vitamin D3 Supplement.

Ingredients We Liked: Chicken

Ingredients We Didn’t Like: Sunflower Seed Oil

Guaranteed Analysis

Crude Protein: 16%
Crude Fat: 2.6%
Moisture: 80%
Ash: 1.6%

Dry Matter Basis

Protein: 80%
Fat: 13%

Caloric Weight Basis

Protein: 71.7%
Fat: 28.3%

What We Liked:

  • Great for cats who prefer shreds and stews over pate
  • Very high in moisture and animal-sourced protein
  • Low fat and negligible carbohydrate content
  • Popular among picky eaters

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Relies primarily on plant-sourced fat
  • Low calorie density may require larger portions for some cats

#6 Best for Seniors: Weruva Truluxe Steak Frites Dinner

Weruva TruLuxe Cat Food, Steak Frites

  • Made In: Thailand
  • Guaranteed Protein: 10% Min
  • Age Range: Adult
  • Calories Per Ounce: 21
  • Price Per Ounce: $0.65 per oz
  • Typical Cost Per Day: $6.00 per day

Weruva offers simple recipes with just a few minimally-processed ingredients. When you open up a can or pouch of Weruva, you see real meat—shredded meat, chunks of fish, and other good-enough-to-eat ingredients. This recipe features fresh beef as the primary ingredient.

With its high protein and moisture content, this recipe offers a carnivore-appropriate source of nutrition. The shredded texture is easy for older cats to chew and the food is relatively low in phosphorus. At around 1.0 mg of phosphorus per 1,000 calories, this recipe may support your cat’s kidney health as they age.

Ingredients

Beef Broth, Beef, Pumpkin, Sweet Potato, Potato Starch, Carrot, Sunflower Seed Oil, Tricalcium Phosphate, Xanthan Gum, Potassium Chloride, Choline Chloride, Salt, Taurine, Zinc Sulfate, Vitamin E Supplement, Nicotinic Acid (Vitamin B3 Supplement), Ferrous Sulfate, Manganese Proteinate, Calcium Pantothenate, Thiamine Mononitrate, Vitamin A Supplement, Riboflavin Supplement (Vitamin B2), Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (Vitamin B6), Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid, Copper Sulfate, Potassium Iodide, Sodium Selenite, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement.

Ingredients We Liked: Beef

Ingredients We Didn’t Like: Potato Starch, Sunflower Seed Oil, Xanthan Gum

Guaranteed Analysis

Crude Protein: 10%
Crude Fat: 1.3%
Crude Fiber: 0.5%
Moisture: 86%

Dry Matter Basis

Protein: 71.43%
Fat: 9.29%
Fiber: 3.57%
Carbs: 15.71%

Caloric Weight Basis

Protein: 65.12%
Fat: 20.56%
Carbs: 14.33%

What We Liked:

  • Rich in easily digestible animal protein
  • Good source of hydrating moisture for cats
  • Fairly low carbohydrate content
  • Low in phosphorus, may support kidney health

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Relies on plant-sourced fat

#7 Best for Sensitive Digestion: Koha Chicken Stew

Koha Chicken Stew Wet Cat Food

  • Made In: Thailand
  • Guaranteed Protein: 8% min.
  • Age Range: Adult
  • Calories Per Ounce: 24
  • Price Per Ounce$0.40 per oz
  • Typical Cost Per Day: $3.30 per day

Koha is a wet-only pet food company, and their formulas are designed with a limited number of ingredients. Many of their recipes are made with novel animal proteins. As a line of minimal-ingredient foods, Koha is a great choice for cats with sensitive digestion. The foods are high in moisture and free from starchy potatoes, peas, and other ingredients that can be difficult for cats to digest.

This minimal ingredient formula features a short list of whole food ingredients starting with fresh chicken. It’s cooked in chicken and vegetable broths, yielding a high-moisture recipe that is both hydrating and easy for cats to digest. As a single-protein recipe, this formula may be a good choice for cats with food allergies and sensitive digestionas long as they can tolerate chicken. If not, Koha offers several other minimal ingredient stew flavors such as duck and turkey.

The food is supplemented with porcine plasma, a species-appropriate source of amino acids and essential nutrients. It also contains New Zealand green mussels which provide animal-sourced glucosamine and chondroitin for joint support.

Ingredients

Chicken, Chicken Broth, Vegetable Broth, Chicken Liver, Porcine Plasma, Dried Egg Product, Dried Chickpeas, Xanthan Gum, Pumpkin, Calcium Carbonate, New Zealand Green Mussel, Salt, Sodium Phosphate, Potassium Chloride, Dandelion Greens, Taurine, Choline Chloride, Parsley, Cranberries, Dried Kale, Turmeric, Iron Proteinate, Zinc Proteinate, Ginger, Fenugreek Seed, Vitamin E Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Sodium Selenite, Niacin Supplement, d-Calcium Pantothenate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Riboflavin Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Biotin, Potassium Iodide, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Folic Acid

Ingredients We Liked: Chicken, Chicken Liver, Porcine Plasma, Dried Egg Product, New Zealand Green Mussel

Ingredients We Didn’t Like: Dried Chickpeas, Xanthan Gum

Guaranteed Analysis

Crude Protein: 8%
Crude Fat: 3.5%
Crude Fiber: 1.5%
Moisture: 82%
Ash: 2.59%

Dry Matter Basis

Protein: 44.44%
Fat: 19.44%
Fiber: 8.33%
Carbs: 13.39%

Caloric Weight Basis

Protein: 42.31%
Fat: 44.95%
Carbs: 12.74%

What We Liked:

  • Short list of simple ingredients for digestibility
  • Contains over 50% dry matter protein
  • Rich in moisture to support hydration and digestion
  • Free from potatoes and peas

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Contains chickpeas

#8 Best for Picky Cats: Caru Classics Turkey Stew

  • Made In: United States
  • Guaranteed Protein: 9% Min
  • Age Range: All Life Stages
  • Calories Per Ounce: 28
  • Price Per Ounce: $0.50 per oz
  • Typical Cost Per Day: $3.60 per day

Finicky felines can be difficult to please but many cat owners report that even their picky cats enjoy this turkey stew-style wet food. It’s made with turkey as a single source of protein which is novel for many cats as well, so it could also be a good choice for cats with food allergies or sensitivities.

This cat food features a short list of whole food ingredients. It’s free from carrageenan and gum thickeners, though it does contain a little tapioca starch as a binder. The dry matter carbohydrate content remains very low, however.

Though some cat owners find this food to be a little too soupy, the texture makes it a great food topper or meal mixer. It’s packed with protein and hydrating moisture without any hard-to-digest beans, peas, or legumes.

Ingredients

Turkey, Turkey Bone Broth, Tapioca Starch, Natural Flavor, Sweet Potato, Apples, Carrots, Tricalcium Phosphate, Celery Root, Marine Microalgae Oil (Source of Omega-3 Fatty Acids), Calcium Carbonate, Minerals (Zinc Amino Acid Chelate, Iron Amino Acid Chelate, Copper Amino Acid Chelate, Manganese Amino Acid Chelate, Iodine Amino Acid Chelate, Sodium Selenite), Choline Chloride, Potassium Chloride, Vitamins (Vitamin A Supplement, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Vitamin E Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Niacin Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, d-Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin Supplement, Folic Acid, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement), Taurine, Dandelion Greens, Magnesium Proteinate.

Ingredients We Liked: Turkey, Turkey Bone Broth, Marine Microalgae Oil

Ingredients We Didn’t Like: Tapioca Starch

Guaranteed Analysis

Crude Protein: 9%
Crude Fat: 2%
Crude Fiber: 1%
Moisture: 82%
Ash: 3.6%

Dry Matter Basis

Protein: 50%
Fat: 11.11%
Fiber: 5.56%
Carbs: 13.33%

Caloric Weight Basis

Protein: 55.36%
Fat: 29.88%
Carbs: 14.76%

What We Liked:

  • Single-protein recipe appropriate for cats with allergies
  • Cats seem to like the flavor and texture
  • High moisture content supports your cat’s hydration
  • Very low carbohydrate content

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Cardboard cartons can be tricky to open
  • Some customers found the food too soupy

#9 Best Novel Protein: Ziwi Peak Venison Recipe

  • Made In: New Zealand
  • Guaranteed Protein: 10% Min
  • Age Range: All Life Stages
  • Calories Per Ounce: 34
  • Price Per Ounce: $1.20 per oz
  • Typical Cost Per Day: $7.00 per day

Since being founded in 2004, Ziwi Peak has consistently produced some of the best natural cat foods on the market. While the company is best known for dehydrated jerky-style food for pets, their canned cat food offers superior hydration. Ziwi Peak relies on ethically sourced meat and seafood from New Zealand, farms, ranches, and waters. All their farmed proteins are free-range and grass-fed while their fish ingredients are sustainably sourced.

This product is 92% meat, organs, and bone from non-rendered venison, meaning that it delivers species-appropriate nutrition that’s easy for your cat to digest. In addition to lung, kidney, liver, and other organs, the food contains venison tripe, which is the deer’s highly-nourishing stomach lining.

The recipe also contains green-lipped mussel, a natural source of glucosamine and chondroitin. These nutrients help support your cat’s joint health. Though the recipe contains a small amount of chickpeas, it’s still fairly low in carbohydrates and generally reflects your cat’s natural dietary needs. It’s made without artificial colors, flavors, or preservatives, and is free from carrageenan and gum thickeners.

Ingredients

Venison, Water Sufficient for Processing, Venison Tripe, Venison Liver, Chickpeas, Venison Lung, Venison Heart, Venison Kidney, New Zealand Green Mussel, Venison Bone, DL-Methionine, Dried Kelp, Minerals (Magnesium Sulfate, Zinc Amino Acid Complex, Manganese Amino Acid Complex, Copper Amino Acid Complex), Taurine, Vitamins (Vitamin E Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid).

Ingredients We Liked: Venison, Venison Tripe, Venison Liver, Venison Lung, Venison Heart, Venison Kidney, New Zealand Green Mussel, Venison Bone

Ingredients We Didn’t Like: Chickpeas

Guaranteed Analysis

Crude Protein: 10%
Crude Fat: 4%
Crude Fiber: 2%
Moisture: 78%
Ash: 3%

Dry Matter Basis

Protein: 45.45%
Fat: 18.18%
Fiber: 9.09%
Carbs: 13.64%

Caloric Weight Basis

Protein: 44.03%
Fat: 42.77%
Carbs: 13.21%

What We Liked:

  • Made with 92% muscle meat, organs, and New Zealand green mussels
  • Novel protein source for cats with food allergies
  • High in moisture to support hydration
  • Glucosamine and chondroitin provide joint support

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Contains chickpeas

#10 Best for Gravy Lovers: Weruva Cats in the Kitchen Chicken Frick ‘A Zee

Weruva Cats in the Kitchen Chicken Frick ‘A Zee

  • Made In: Thailand
  • Guaranteed Protein: 10% Min
  • Age Range: Adult
  • Calories Per Ounce: 23
  • Price Per Ounce: $0.39 per oz
  • Typical Cost Per Day: $3.50 per day

Cats who like table scraps and gravy will love the texture of Weruva cat food. This cat food is extremely water-dense, so it has fewer calories per can than other foods. This both makes it excellent for cats who need to lose weight and more expensive than the average food.

This chicken-based recipe consists of shredded chicken in a broth thickened with locust bean gum, xanthan gum, and guar gum. These gums aren’t a necessary part of the feline diet, but there’s little indication that they’re harmful. The food offers a hydrating source of moisture and appears easy for most cats to digest.

Ingredients

Chicken, Chicken Broth, Sunflower Seed Oil, Locust Bean Gum, Calcium Lactate, Guar Gum, Xanthan Gum, Tricalcium Phosphate, Potassium Chloride, Fish Oil, Choline Chloride, Taurine, Zinc Sulfate, Vitamin E Supplement, Nicotinic Acid (Vitamin B3), Ferrous Sulfate, Manganese Proteinate, Thiamine Mononitrate (Vitamin B1), Calcium Pantothenate, Vitamin A Supplement, Riboflavin Supplement (Vitamin B2), Pyridoxine Hydrochloride (Vitamin B6), Copper Sulfate, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Folic Acid, Potassium Iodide, Sodium Selenite, Biotin, Vitamin B12 Supplement.

Ingredients We Liked: Chicken, Fish Oil

Ingredients We Didn’t Like: Sunflower Seed Oil, Xanthan Gum, Guar Gum

Guaranteed Analysis

Crude Protein: 10%
Crude Fat: 2.5%
Crude Fiber: 0.5%
Moisture: 85%

Dry Matter Basis

Protein: 66.67%
Fat: 16.67%
Fiber: 3.33%
Carbs: 13.33%

Caloric Weight Basis

Protein: 55.34%
Fat: 33.6%
Carbs: 11.07%

What We Liked:

  • Simple chicken-based recipe is easy to digest
  • Rich in hydrating moisture
  • Gravy-like consistency appeals to many cats

What We Didn’t Like:

  • Very watery—you don’t get many calories per can
  • B.F.F., a Weruva brand, was involved in a serious recall in 2017

Best Wet Cat Food: Comparison Table

Product Name Smalls Ground Bird Fresh Cat Food Open Farm Harvest Chicken Rustic Blend  Dave’s Pet Food Naturally Healthy Grain-Free Turkey Formula Canned Food RAWZ 96% Turkey & Turkey Liver Paté Tiki Cat Succulent Chicken Recipe in Chicken Consommé Weruva Truluxe Steak Frites Dinner  Koha Chicken Stew  Caru Classics Turkey Stew Ziwi Peak Venison Recipe  Weruva Cats in the Kitchen Chicken Frick ‘A Zee
Primary Protein Chicken Chicken Turkey Turkey Chicken Beef Chicken Stew Turkey Venison Chicken
Age Range  All Life Stages All Life Stages Adult All Life Stages Adult Adult Adult All Life Stages All Life Stages Adult
Guaranteed Protein 13% 7% 10% 9% 16% 10% 8% 9% 10% 10%
Calories Per Ounce 40 30 33 37 25 21 24 28 34 23
Cost Per Day $4.00 per day $3.60 per day $1.64 per day $2.90 per day $5.00 per day $6.00 per day $3.30 per day $3.60 per day $7.00 per day $3.50 per day

*Cost per day is calculated using the food’s average cost per ounce and the daily caloric requirement for a healthy adult cat (about 200 calories).

What to Look for When Buying Wet Cat Food

With its focus on animal ingredients and hydrating moisture, wet cat food is one of the most species-appropriate options for cats. But all wet cat foods are not created equal. It’s important to prioritize formulas that complement your cat’s biology as an obligate carnivore and avoid additives that could harm your cat. 

Here are a few things to consider when shopping for wet cat food.

Choose Low-Carbohydrate Options

Dr. Youens reminds us that, as carnivores, cats “have quite unique needs from their diet, gaining most of their energy from protein rather than carbohydrate and using fats to process certain vitamins and essential nutrients.” An ideal diet for cats gets fewer than 10% of its calories from carbohydrates. When carbohydrates are included, whole grains and low-glycemic veggies are preferable to harder-to-digest ingredients like peas and legumes.

Prioritize Animal-Sourced Protein

Your cat’s body is designed to process whole prey, so animal-sourced ingredients are more biologically valuable than plants. Animal protein contains all the amino acids your cat needs, so it’s best to choose cat foods that list whole meat as the first ingredient. Plant proteins like corn gluten meal and pea protein aren’t carnivore-appropriate.

Dr. Albert Ahn, DVM recommends choosing whole proteins over meat by-products. While by-products are not necessarily problematic, there is some degree of uncertainty surrounding their quality. Dr. Ahn recommends cat foods “that are minimally-processed, using high quality, wholesome ingredients that can help provide excellent nutrition.”

Avoid Artificial Additives and Unsafe Ingredients

Synthetic flavors, colors, and preservatives can trigger inflammation or otherwise damage your cat’s health over time. It’s best to stick with wet cat foods that use natural alternatives. Canned foods tend to rely less heavily on preservatives than kibble but often make use of binders and thickeners. Though naturally derived, gum thickeners may contribute to loose stools while some ingredients, like carrageenan, have been called into question as a potential health risk.

Select Reputable Brands

Buy from companies with a reputation for quality control, safety, reliability, and good customer service. Avoid brands with an extensive history of recalls or poor customer service. There’s no need to dismiss a company based on a single minor recall, however, provided that they responded to it swiftly, honestly, and effectively.

Frequently Asked Questions

What wet food do vets recommend for cats?

Dr. Albert Ahn, DVM recommends that “pet owners look at the ingredient panel of the food they are purchasing for their kitten or adult cat. The more ingredients that are whole (e.g. chicken, beef, etc.), rather than heavily processed (e.g. chicken meal, fish meal, turkey meal, etc.), the better.”

What is the best wet cat food from the grocery store?

Product availability differs by location and store, so pet owners should evaluate individual products before making their selection. Choose a wet cat food that names a whole animal protein as the first ingredient. Foods with shorter ingredients lists tend to be more easily digestible, provided they do not contain artificial additives or a high concentration of plant ingredients.

What wet food is the healthiest for cats?

The healthiest option is one that honors your cat’s nutritional needs as an obligate carnivore. The food should contain a higher concentration of animal than plant ingredients, ideally with a carbohydrate content under 10% (measured as dry matter). It should be rich in moisture and free from artificial flavors, colors, and preservatives.

How many cans of wet cat food should a cat eat per day?

It depends on the recipe’s caloric density. A healthy 10-pound adult cat requires about 200 calories per day. To determine how many cans you’ll need to offer, divide 200 by the total number of calories per can. Alternatively, you can find the approximate per-ounce caloric density by dividing the calories per kilogram by 35.

Note: The values in our nutrient charts are automatically calculated based on the guaranteed analysis and may not represent typical nutrient values. This may lead to discrepancies between the charts and the values mentioned in the body of the review.
small mallory photo

About Mallory Crusta

Mallory is the Head of Content at Cats.com and an NAVC-certified Pet Nutrition Coach. Having produced and managed multimedia content across several pet-related domains, Mallory is dedicated to ensuring that the information on Cats.com is accurate, clear, and engaging. When she’s not reviewing pet products or editing content, Mallory enjoys skiing, hiking, and trying out new recipes in the kitchen. She has two cats, Wessie and Forest.

181 thoughts on “The 10 Best Canned, Soft, & Wet Cat Foods of 2024”

+ Add Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

  1. rick

    question, first of all, thank you for this site and research Mallory. my question is, if after you have fed your cat a certain kind of pate for weeks, then your cat vomits once, does that mean your cat is now intolerant of THAT particular kind of food? my wife switches can food every time our cat vomits and it make me question it.

    Reply
    1. Mallory Crusta

      Hi Rick,

      Thanks for your question! Vomiting once after weeks of feeding doesn’t necessarily indicate an intolerance. If you really want to get to the bottom of this, I’d recommend trying an elimination diet and carefully reintroducing proteins to determine which, if any, protein sources trigger GI issues. Otherwise, you’re switching foods willy-nilly and, even if your cat does have a food intolerance or allergy, you don’t know exactly which ingredients he or she is sensitive to.

      Hope this answers your question!

      Best,

      Mallory

      Reply
    2. Linda Owings

      What I have to say is nothing nice but…if the truth be known all cat’s domestic and the big cat’s are carnivores they have to have meat (red meat)Fish and seafood is good (shrimp, lobster, white fish, trout, cod )poultry not so much. Red meat is a must have without red meat cat’s can suffer from anemia and die. Now Science and research are using cat’s for research, trying to find out what makes the cat’s do what they do. Always land on their feet, their independence, survive on their own even the house cat will become feral. As for all this new high tech food Seriously fruits and vegetables probiotics vitamins etc,etc etc. Not only cat’s, dog’s, and pretty much all species are lab rats. Trying to get cat food close to human consumption! Lots of luck. A cat will leave you if you don’t feed them what they want. People can’t own a cat although they are dedicated loyal mysterious their instincts and intuition is amazing. But very Finicky when it comes to eating, when they refuse to eat the food trust and believe they will be gone and catch their own

      Reply
      1. Emmbee

        Dear Linda. With respect, there are many (many) points you make that are simply not true…not factual. Please be careful when adding content to websites like these. Someone who doesn’t know better may actually take what you say at face value and the only one to suffer in the end will be their cat.

        Reply
    3. Michele Beckett

      We have been lucky to find cats people throw away. Some have been ill. I try to use good cat food, even organic but with 6 cats it is not easy. I have some issues with my older cats, 3 were born with heart murmurs, now we found a lil one and went thru hard time with spay surgery as they changed her food. I keep up on recalls, but I still love my ProPlan, it has been recalled once (dry), I use the urinary tract wet once a week (one can for all). I found Gentle Giant, it is made in USA, it excellent food, no recalls that I have seen. It is bit costly but this lil one we found fell in love with it, turned nose up to all the good brands (til now). I did not see a review but it is for all ages, has vitamins for amino, joints, growing. I have it added to all the foods including our Puppy has dry. It is 1/to and no complaints no health issues. It helped a cat along with Hemp oil who had colon cancer for years, he left us this year. My lil Boo had kidney failure or heart. He was 8. Now we have skinny 6 mos old with all the energy you can imagine. She does approx 3/4 of can a day. We have added other foods to let her get more basic cat needs in meat. The wet helped us thru day but not bowl full. I keep it contained since all my others love free meals. I hope we are doing well but I think package directions do not help estimate daily allowance/meal cup or spoonfuls. I think it gets confusing for people. I use teaspoon, give her til she does not want…one and half max. She eats 4 times a day, dry is probably the same about 2 tablespoons, she eats , then snacks as needed. She is 6 mos, approx 6 pounds 3 oz. I would like a lean cat…what is best feeding til she turns a year. I am keeping her on kitten as I have no idea what she was fed. She has some injuries which Vet said she is living with well for her youngness. PIZZA (Pizzazz) is cutie, still on downtime as her surgery was week ago. Today was her first day out with the crew. Each of our cats have their own story and needs, so it is hard to get it perfect.
      I Thank you for the gum info. I do not recommend many greens as cats eat little fruits or greens, can cause their own problems. With need to dump food pet food seem to be the dump pit. I do not have time or money to buy food they do need. Hopefully one day I can again. Just wish I could serve a mouse a day to each. Mine do look, in fact by their weight I think they snack too much.
      Thank you

      I read lot of comments, thanks to all for input. I feel so deeply when my cat dies. Except for Boos mystery kidney failure, I only know I have fed them as well as I could, saw vet regularly. I find cats thrown away and I never know why. Some have health issues from start?, from where they came? or from throwing them out..physical problems yes. I had Evening, he was found outside, eating my chicken fod and living with them, oh my. He had always lived in confinement Shelter ? He took long time to teach to come put and use kitty litter outside cage. He was seen, but no one knew why he had prolem. I put him on Hemp Oil and he lived 8 years with us, was approx 10 or so. He died of colon cancer, he had it the whole time, as his issues the last week came back, only in full force. Wild Child was thrown, could not get her…but I found her and kittens…they Mo and boo all have heart murmurs. Mo and Mom have gained weight back since he died 5 mos ago so how do I stop them from eating mice in between meals? Tipser he is approx 16, he was abused but he has a n aura and rought up Wild Child kidz, now Pizza but he cannot have wet or we have issues. Is it the time to change his diet? He is getting up there, and he was losing weight with others, but I di not like that Mo started to eat their foods after Boo died. Now we have been sitting while eat, he is looking better and as I said been loving to new kitten. UK was thrown out, has FIV and is aggressive to my cats..he thinkg they were snacking on him. Evening did pick on him so he is confined to his space and mingles with us as much as possible. He is a Russian Blue, imagine throwing him out…the disease can be lived with, now we may introduce him to Pizza as she sits at his space .. not ready yet as she is healing. They all have issues, and all eat good food. I do have them on ProPlan for Coat, Skin, Urinary. Have been using since it came out for my Rotties. Their coats shined, nothing but ProPlan. One recall. But their Wet Food except Tipser is all great brands and we experiment with meats, fowl, fish. Besides being over weight, we do try to contain their intake of food, so mice might be problem. They are Indoor and sleazy compared to the 6 mos. I believe we all care enough to be here. My problem is the way food is on bags, cans. I do not use grams, etc. I want spoonfuls, cups. I want Calorie idea, and fiber, protein I hear from one Vet low protein over 6 for dogs and cats, then I read no cats need protein. I never thought of carbs because no maufacturer has a bit of info on age, weight Just buy or food … yu do rest. With mixuture of cats we need a chart to use. Manufacturers should have it instead of boasting about their food.
      I do look at organic content as much as meow mix ..must keep consistency in food or issues happen in one or another. I get tired of prescribed food, it has never kept my animal living. Disease progresses, only love, Vet advice is what we have. I eill look into the Petco food but most other contries in East, Africa, south America does not inspect or have guidelines as we do. I do not want to pay for water/broth I can add that. If I am paying $3 a can I better have meat no fillers. Unless I see different, I know cats eat grass, catnip but I never saw my cats eating beans, peas, tomatoes. Or I would cook daily for them. I believe in Hemp Oil, and Diamaceous Earth. I wish we did not have to put chemical on these kidz. I raised dogs and cats for decades with garlic, breweres yeast. Less health issues, no fleas, ticks never heard of Heart Worm. In past 25 years I have spent money on chemicals…one girl licked flea crap ended up with leukemia. WE need real food, real natural treatments, less chemicals if we want our pets to have longer lives. My dogs and cats lived to 18. I am glad to get to * years with my kidz due to throw out issues, that they get to 14 or older I am very glad to have all that love. Thank you all for your input again. Each cat is different, unfortunately disease does not care. I just hope everything you teach me gets me extra weeks, months, years. I have a Pizza to let out. I hope I can learn how to feed her so she doesnot get heavy. But she is stretching out/growing so I will watch when it stops. She likes her wet, I will keep her on it. My cats love water I never thougjt about cats not drinking. Mine get me to change theirs daily, like their litter clean up has to be two days. We haver two ltters per cat. 5 cats right now from 6 mos to 16 years Puppy 3 years this month ….sorry for the full story but at wits end with a kitten been too many years ago Mine had moms

      Reply
    4. Rosie

      I find my one cat will vomit from eating the chunky style food as opposed to pate. Also I started feeding mine on raised dishes as I read that that helps with throwing up and that has really helped. I spread the food around too on the plate to make him eat slower as I find if he eats too quickly he will throw up. Sometimes it can be a hairball too and have nothing to do with the food.
      Hope this helps!!

      Reply
  2. Thais Bell

    The cat I feed and provide a safe place for her to sleep outdoors is a feral Her ear is clipped, which means she is fixed and had shots, hopefully. She loves Meow Mix singles, which I hate due to bad ingredients. I am sure she eats mice, birds and insects, so I want to feed her a better wet cat food and not Pate, which she hates. She loves chicken. What could you suggest? Note: I can’t afford the high price brands.

    Reply
  3. Alex

    Hi. Are there any non grain free wet cat foods that you would recommend. Your top ten are all grain free. I have been reading worrying things about the effects of grain free food on dogs. Worried that these may also be detrimental to cats.

    Reply
    1. Mallory Crusta

      Hi Alex,

      Thanks for your question. I’m not sure what you’ve read about the effects of grain-free food for dogs, but there’s no reason why a grain-free diet would be detrimental to a cat’s health. The foods on this list were chosen for their ingredient quality and meat-heavy, low-carbohydrate formulations. Why? Because that’s what appears to be both natural and nourishing for cats. In terms of feline nutrition, grains are no different from any other high-carbohydrate plant ingredient. They don’t do anything to make cats healthier or happier and there’s no reason to include them in cat food.

      Hope this was helpful!

      Best,

      Mallory

      Reply
        1. Mallory Crusta

          Hi Alex, thanks for sharing that link.

          I’m thinking that since almost all of the reports were associated with grain-free dry food rather than any other variety, the problem is not in the absence of grains but more likely in the presence of other ingredients like potatoes, peas, and other legumes. These ingredients are essential in most grain-free dry foods but very few canned foods have them. Others have speculated that other exotic proteins, fruits, and vegetables may be to blame. These are likely more common in grain-free foods because the grain-free dry food market is so trend-driven. That said, most canned food has been grain-free since day one. Because they’re not as fashionable as grain-free kibble, fewer canned foods contain exotic or trendy ingredients.

          This is an interesting issue and I’ll be staying tuned to learn more about the FDA’s findings.

          Best,

          Mallory

          Reply
  4. Becca Bruce

    My cat was diagnosed with chronic kidney disease and has been eating prescription food since. Now my vet says her numbers have been normal for over a year and it must have been an acute reaction. He wants her to go off of the prescription kidney food. I’m concerned about going from a high carb diet to food that is high in protein, which they all seem to be. What food is higher in carbs and are certain carbs that are better for cats?
    Thank you.

    Reply
    1. Mallory Crusta

      Hi Becca,

      I understand your concerns about switching your cat off the prescription food—I’d probably be apprehensive, too.

      I’m not a vet, so of course, take this with a grain of salt, but I have never found any indication that a high-carbohydrate diet is in any way beneficial for cats with kidney issues. Renal diets tend to be higher in carbohydrates because renal diets are typically low in protein, not because they do anything good for a cat with kidney disease. Carbohydrate matter just happens to fill the void when you cut back on protein. Healthy, diabetic, or suffering from another condition, cats seem to do well on a diet with 10% carbohydrate content or less.

      Secondly, there’s a growing group of veterinarians and researchers who think protein quality is more important than quantity when it comes to controlling kidney disease, so increasing your cat’s protein content likely won’t cause a problem so long as that protein is highly-digestible. Digestibility is a pretty poorly understood area, but in general, it appears that the most digestible protein comes from named meat ingredients—not animal by-products or plant proteins.

      Then there’s the phosphorus issue. You can find plenty of non-prescription foods with phosphorus levels that are safe for both healthy cats and those with kidney disease. Off the top of my head, good brands include Nom Nom, Weruva, and Tiki Cat. Foods that contain ground bone will typically have more phosphorus. This cat food database allows you to search for foods by phosphorus content: https://catinfo.org/chart/index.php

      If you want to learn more about the fundamental ideas behind renal diets, please read our article on the best food for cats with kidney disease. https://cats.com/best-cat-food-for-kidney-disease

      Again, I’m not a veterinarian, but if I were in your position, I would look for a non-prescription food with highly-digestible protein and controlled phosphorus levels. These two qualities would put my mind at ease just in case she does still have some kidney issues and they’re equally appropriate for a cat with full kidney function.

      Hope this answered your questions and helps you to make a decision!

      Take care,

      Mallory

      Reply
      1. Tori

        I also feed my 3 cats Weruva and Tiki Cat. And I feed them Pure Cravings, kind of surprised I haven’t seen anyone else mention that brand. It’s my cats’ favorite canned food. Real pieces of fish in a broth. Says on the can that it is mercury tested. Would like to hear reviews on this brand to make sure it is as good as I think it is.

        Reply
  5. Julie Roberson

    I have 7 cats and really want to feed them the best food which I think is wet food. I have been feeding them the Natures Variety Instinct & Weruva can foods. Also feed them dry (Natures Variety Instincts) mix with the wet. I just really am not sure if that is good for them or not plus I just can’t really afford it. I research and think I have found something but then find out it’s had recalls, or something that’s not good in it. What do you recommend for 7 cats ages 1 year to 3 years old.

    Reply
    1. Mallory Crusta

      Hello Julie,

      First off, it’s great that you’re trying to find the best food for your seven kitties. I know how challenging it is to try to find something that meets all of your requirements. It sounds like you’re on the right track with what you’re feeding your cats now, but if you want something more affordable, you might consider a brand that another commenter recently brought to my attention—Petco’s WholeHearted. WholeHearted food is similar to Tiki Cat or Weruva at a much lower price. Plus it’s never been recalled, which should give you some peace of mind.

      Hope this helps!

      Best,

      Mallory

      Reply
      1. Barb

        My cats were on Wholehearted for 20 years.
        I plan on putting my 4 mo old kitty on it as well once he reaches 1 yr old. (He’s on pricey Royal Canin Kitten)

        Reply
  6. Rose Stone

    Hi, I have a three year old cat, Schmoopy, who was recently diagnosed with congestive heart failure and given a three month to three year survival time. After some research I have decided on an organic herbal heart remedy and most importantly a high quality human grade pet food. In your opinion is there such a pet food on the market? Are any of the above foods superior for a sick kitty?

    Reply
  7. Mallory Crusta

    Hi Rose,

    Thanks for your comment. I’m sorry to hear that Schmoopy was diagnosed with congestive heart failure—that must have been hard news to receive.

    To answer your question, any of the foods listed in this article should be good for your kitty. Of the brands listed, Weruva, Tiki Cat, and Nom Nom are the only ones that claim to use human-grade ingredients or human food processing facilities. While the others are made in Thailand, Nom Nom is made in a US kitchen that meets human food safety standards. All of the brands on this list—whether they emphasize human-grade ingredients or not—appear to use top-quality ingredients and have good safety reputations, but if that human-grade status is your top priority, I’d go for Nom Nom.

    Remember—many companies use ingredients that are technically human-grade but don’t make human-grade claims about their food. Feel free to try a variety of foods to find out which ones meet both your and Schmoopy’s standards.

    Hope this helps!

    Take care,

    Mallory

    Reply
  8. Delmy Rivera

    Hi, I have a cat that was diagnosed with crystals in his urine.. I want to know if I should switch his food from Royal canin to Farmina vet life Strivite it’s another prescription food.He really likes it and it has potato as one of the ingredients. Is this good for my cat?

    Reply
    1. Mallory Crusta

      Hi Delmy,

      Thanks for commenting!

      Farmina Vet Life Struvite food may be able to help your cat—provided that you know he has struvite, not calcium oxalate, crystals.

      It’s hard to say whether the Farmina or Royal Canin food is a better option, especially since you didn’t mention which Royal Canin food you’ve been buying. Royal Canin has a larger variety of urinary tract foods, including a selection of wet recipes, so they’re a better option for those who want to make sure their cat gets enough moisture.

      As far as I can tell, Farmina Vet Life Struvite Management is only available in a dry variety. This means that while it addresses crystal formation in other areas, it fails to provide something vital to urinary tract health—moisture. Unless absolutely necessary, we always encourage people to pass on dry food—prescription or otherwise—in favor of high-moisture diets.

      Ultimately, I would continue feeding the Farmina Vet Life food while incorporating more water-rich products as much as you can.

      Our article on the best cat food for urinary health may help you further:

      https://cats.com/best-cat-food-urinary-tract-health

      Hope this helps!

      Best,

      Mallory

      Reply
  9. Emily Johnston

    Hi 1st time kitty mama here I’m trying to do all the research I can to make sure I’m feeding her healthy foods. And after looking at this site the food I thought was a good food was given a C by this site so I had gotten some samples of the simply nourish and she seems to like it..which from reading on here it’s looks like it’s a pretty good brand for dry food. I’ve been buying the blue buffalo kitten wet food though… However I have heard mixed reviews about blue buffalo as well so I’m thinking maybe of going to the wellness brand or natures variety. But anyways any tips for this 1st time cat owner would be greatly appreciated. It really looks like this site really dives in and does it’s research. So thank you for having this out here for us!

    Reply
    1. Mallory Crusta

      Hello Emily,

      Glad to have you here!

      Simply Nourish, Wellness, and Nature’s Variety are all decent options for your kitten. I recommend giving all of them a try. Find out which of them she prefers and which work for you.

      Feeding a cat should be easy and intuitive—if you ever find that it’s stressing you out, you’re worrying too much. To keep it simple, remember that your kitten is a carnivore. The more her food resembles an animal, the better. Like a fresh prey animal, a good feline diet is high in protein with moderate fat, low or no carbohydrates, and all of the vitamins, amino acids, and fatty acids your cat needs to thrive. Most freeze-dried and raw diets do this pretty well, with canned foods a close second. Dry foods are usually a little bit more plant-heavy and don’t have the water content your cat needs. Once you have that foundation down, it’s all about accommodating budget, taste preferences, and sometimes, health issues.

      Have you read our complete guide to feline nutrition? If you haven’t, you may want to check it out—it’s a long, comprehensive piece that will give you a good sense of which foods are best and why.

      https://cats.com/the-complete-guide-to-feline-nutrition

      Other than that, enjoy your new kitten! This is a special time and I’m excited for you.

      Take care,

      Mallory

      Reply
  10. Datdamwuf

    Hello,
    good breakdown but can you tell me how you reached the estimated cost per day? I used to have a link to good calculator for calories per day by (healthy) weight but can’t find it. Is your estimate based on a 10 lb cat, or? My main coons ate 5.5 ounces 2 x a day of Wellness grain free and similar brands.

    Reply
    1. Mallory Crusta

      Hello!

      Thanks for commenting.

      I calculated the typical cost per day based on 200 calories per day, which is a generally good target for a 10-lb cat. I don’t know how it compares to the calculator you used to have a link to, but you might like this calculator:

      https://cats.com/cat-calorie-calculator

      Hope this answers your question! Let us know if you need anything else.

      Best,

      Mallory

      Reply
      1. Norfarizan Atan

        Hi Mallory, writing from S’pore here. Happened to this website by chance and very glad that I did. I have a senior girl cat, whom has a dehydration issue. She became fussy about eating in the past year and only eats wet food now. She does not like drinking water and so, i’veen feeding her a combination of puree, mousse, canned food, and weekly chicken/tuna fillets as treats. This was by recomended by some friends but it turns out, her dehydration issue has not improved, based on the blood tests just did yesterday. Sorry for being long-winded. Can you please recommend a suitable range/brand for my cat? Must be free of pork ingredients…..thank you. PS: bought a water fountain but she wont drink from it(:

        Reply
        1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

          Hey there! Glad you stumbled upon the site. Between the variety of high-moisture foods and the water fountain (even though she won’t drink from it), you’re certainly giving your cat plenty of options for getting hydrated. Before focusing on her diet, I would focus on the underlying cause of the dehydration.

          Reply
          1. Mahnoor Khan

            Hi Mallory! I have a 1 year old cat that I want to feed her wet food. Currently, I’ve been feeding her dry cat food with water added. Could I start feeding her wet food right away or should I transition to wet food slowly? Also, can you tell me if the Berkley Jensen Beef and Poultry in Gravy wet cat food is good for my cat please?
            Thanks!

          2. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

            Hello Mahnoor, I would recommend a gradual transition. As for the quality of Berkley Jensen Beef and Poultry in Gravy food, it appears to be an acceptable choice similar to food from Friskies or Fancy Feast. While some of its vaguely-labeled ingredients like “animal liver” and “meat by-products” do raise some questions about quality, the food presents a good concentration of animal ingredients and protein without a lot of starch. Considering that it’s also formulated to meet AAFCO requirements, it appears to be a sound wet food choice.

  11. CpCats

    I would not recommend the Dr Elsey’s Clean Protein for senior cats. The inclusion of agar-agar makes it a no go for cats with hyperthyroidism, which is an extremely common disease in senior-age cats.
    Agar-agar is a seaweed derived ingredient (like carrageenan) and so contains excess iodine, which will make hyperthyroidism worse

    Reply
  12. Mallory Crusta

    Hi CpCats,

    Thank you for your observations on agar-agar for cats with hyperthyroidism. Though Dr. Elsey’s food still looks like a worthwhile option for the majority of senior cats, you’re right—it might not be a good choice for cats with hyperthyroidism. We’ve updated the article to address this issue.

    Best,

    Mallory

    Reply
  13. Judy M.

    Great article with clear concise information. I just adopted two five month old kittens. I need to be at a moderate cost on the food but want good quality. I purchased some Whole Hearted wet kitten food and somehow missed the very tiny Product of Thailand on the label. I want to stick to made in the USA. I’m thinking that I’d like to feed a combination of wet and dry (not mixed together). I lost a cat to Feline Urological Disease once and never want to go down that road again. Thanks for the great information and any advice would be greatly appreciated.

    Reply
  14. Dana Stevens

    I notice Smalls is not in your list of best wet cat foods. But I also see you gave it a very good review separately. Not having been able to get my cats to eat nom nom, I m trying to decide between Smalls fresh and Tiki Cat canned salmon which they also love. How would you compare Smalls fresh with Tiki Cat?

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Hi Dana, good question! Smalls fresh cat food is nutritionally comparable to Tiki Cat and slightly cheaper. The biggest question is whether or not it appeals to your cat’s texture and taste preferences. I’d recommend giving Smalls a try and seeing if your cat likes it, then making a decision from there.

      Reply
  15. Jenny azcat

    I’ve ordered this before and my cats like it and it’s healthy good food. My only issue is with the vendor, K9 Naturals. The cans were all loose out of the packaging and many were dented. It looked like someone tossed them into the box from across the room. This is not okay in any circumstances, but especially for the high price of this food!

    Reply
  16. Camryn

    Our 3 year old cat has never been picky about canned food. He loved everything. We bought this for him because of the great ingredients and now he refuses to eat anything else. I mean absolutely will not go near anything else. Now we have to commit to the pricetag. Lesson learned: don’t buy the good stuff if you can’t commit!!

    Reply
  17. Ann Moody

    Based largely on your reviews and advice, we have been transitioning our overweight senior, recently adopted shelter cat to a wet-based diet. She had been on Hills Science Diet Adult Light exclusively for several years due to observed indigestion problems at the shelter, and I appreciate their efforts to take the best care of her that they could. I was nervous about any change for this reason. However, I am transitioning her to a more varied, wet-based diet (probably about 60-40 wet to dry but I want to get her to about 80-20), and her kibble to Tiki Cat Born Carnivore Light, which she really likes – though it probably has more fiber and plant matter than she needs, it seems to be a good transition food from the corn, wheat, and rice that were the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th ingredients in her prior diet.

    I also have given her several Tiki Cat wet foods, including the full Grill line and the Tiki Cat Stix wet treats. I notice in other brand reviews you mention a concern with too much fish in a cat’s diet so I have been introducing novel proteins as well – like lamb, venison, and duck. I want to thank you for this site and all your useful information. Right now in the house we have cans of Nulo, Authority, Purina Muse, Wellness Core, Tiki Cat, Nutro, Fancy Feast (flaked fish and shrimp only) , Great Choice (Petsmart cheapo store brand), and Sheba, which in particular is handy because it’s readily available at the local Dollar General and also pretty cheap, and my mom finds it easiest to feed the cat in the little portioned servings as packaged.

    I do not shop strictly by brand, but by ingredients as you have basically taught me. I can see it might be possible to get a budget or store brand with meat based ingredients and no grain or carrageenan which could be healthier than a fancy brand full of cornmeal and icky additives.

    I am happy to report that in spite of the shelter stating this cat had to be kept on the strict dry diet of just the one food, which she was on for at least two full years, she has been doing very well on the wet-based diet and completely different kibble. LItter box use indicates the plumbing is functioning well, hairballs don’t seem to be a problem. She has seemed to like almost everything I have given her and it’s literally all been because of your recommendations. I have not been focusing on her weight but I think she is losing very slowly as wet food makes up a higher proportion of her diet and I will gradually cut down as needed going forward.

    Thank you not only for the details on so many brands and varieties, but much more importantly, the education on what to look for on every single package before we buy so I can make good choices for her every time I shop. This is easily the best website I have found anywhere on the internet for outstanding cat food advice.

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Oh, Ann, this is such a wonderful comment! It brightened my day. It’s great to see your thought process as you made changes in your cat’s diet and—best of all—to hear that your choices are bringing about such great results. Keep up the great work!

      Reply
    2. Geoffrey Schrader

      This is the first mention of Sheeba. which surprises me. Sheeba is the primary wet food Rainbow eats, with a kibble in-between Sheeba in the morning and evening. It’s tough here, particularly since the pandemic. There’s not a lot of choice. Rainbow and I live in a RV in the Sonoran desert of Southern Arizona. There are two stores that carry cat food and the nearest pet store is 40 mile round-trip away in Phoenix. I cannot afford fuel for my pickup to go that far with fuel around $5/gallon. Rainbow was a rescued feral, a Turkish Van. She was brought out of the desert at approximately two months old when I adopted her. She looks healthy. I’m just sayin’ , because we can’t be too picky.

      Reply
  18. Amanda Antognini

    I have a 14 year old male. He has been eating blue Buffalo dry and canned. He now seems to vomit every time he eats the canned food, also does not seem interested in the dry food. We recently adopted an overweight 6 year old female who is eating rachel ray’s grain free wet food my senior wants her food but vomits unless I give him a tiny bit. I have read and researched for hours, just when I think I’ve found the right food I find something that makes me second guess my choice. Please help!

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Hi Amanda, it is a challenging situation! Have you ruled out illness? If your 14-year-old is vomiting after eating both the Blue Buffalo and Rachael Ray food, it could point to something other than a dietary issue. I would seek a veterinarian’s input before seeking dietary modifications.

      Reply
  19. Rosa Maria

    Feline natural canned cat food and pure vita are a few of them which my little kitty likes the most. By the way, I have noted other cat foods you suggested. However, I am not sure if my cat loves a different taste or not. Still, I would love to try them. Thanks!

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Newman’s Own foods can be a good option if you’re intent on choosing organic cat food! Their foods contain a little more plant matter than I’d consider ideal and they contain carrageenan, but overall, they seem to have comparably high-quality ingredients and, if you can find them in a store in your area, they could be a good choice. I’ve noticed that their cat foods are difficult to find online through Chewy or Amazon.

      Reply
      1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

        Hi there. While we can easily update the articles, it’s more difficult to update our videos. I would go with the recommendations on the page. Thanks!

        Reply
  20. Susan

    Thank you for your research and the resulting list. I completely switched to wet food a few years ago but unfortunately lost a very special cat not long after. Exploratory abdominal surgery found abscesses all over his pancreas leaving only about 10% of the organ viable. The vet was quite surprised at this finding and told me this is quite rare in cats and more common in dogs. I still don’t know if this condition could have been caused by something in what I had been feeding (I had him since he was old enough to adopt as a kitten and lost him at age 11). As a result I take what I feed even more seriously than before. I have fed a couple of the brands in your top 10 and am re-evaluating for my 2 cats (one is 12, the other 2). I also found a pretty extensive list with recommendations of what to feed and what to avoid, along with explanations, at the following link: https://happycatshaven.org/knowledgebase/cat-food-what-to-feed-what-to-avoid/. This list includes many of the things you say to avoid and adds others. Unfortunately even the “better” brands often have ingredients this list says should be avoided. Additionally I noticed kelp in a couple of brands in your top 10 and found an article discussing the possible dangers of kelp for cats and dogs, https://www.pethealthandnutritioncenter.com/kelp-iodine-for-dogs-and-cats.html. Finding a truly healthy/ species appropriate food is challenging and time consuming. I want to make a very informed decision for my 2 guys.

    Reply
  21. Judy

    Hi, regarding the Ziwi review, the can and ingredients say it’s venison, but your review says lamb. Venison is deer meat so these can’t both be correct. Lamb is not listed in the ingredients. Just thought you might want to correct whichever is the error. Thanks!

    Reply
  22. Jackie Ann

    Hi! I just got my sampler of smalls- thought I should ask, are you sponsored in any way by them? I’m eager to give them a shot but I am a little weary of cat foods with a lot of bone content as my 1.5 year old already has a little granular activity going on in his bladder, which I think was due to feeding him orijen six fish for a while. I just want to make sure he stays healthy! Thanks for this site- very helpful!

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Hi Jackie, thank you for commenting! We are not sponsored by Smalls, but we do receive affiliate commissions on sales made through our links. As for the bone content of Smalls and how it might affect your cat’s health, I would certainly recommend consulting with a veterinarian before making this decision. Their freeze-dried food does contain bone and may have slightly higher-than-absolutely-necessary levels of phosphorus and other minerals, but it’s difficult to say exactly how that would affect your cat’s health. Thank you again for stopping by and I hope you find something that’s a good fit for your kitty!

      Reply
  23. Susie

    Thank you so much for your research! I have three felines and feed them both dry and wet food. One is an older kitten but the other two are adults. They are picky eaters and I’ve had a time finding food they all like. One of my girls is a large (big boned) cat who is a bit overweight as well so I worry about diabetes – but so far so good.
    I recently switched to Purina pro plan LiveClear because my son, who visits frequently, has developed a severe cat allergy. The food did not seem to make a difference so I am open to switching again and will consider your recommendations for dry food here. QUESTION : I have been feeding them AVODERM Grain Free Tuna and Chicken recipe which I picked up from Chewy and at the time had good reviews. I do not see a that you reviewed this food yet but maybe I missed it? Your comments would be mightily appreciated! PS: one of my cats tends to vomit for unknown reasons – she has been given a clean bill of health. I have not found a food that makes a difference with that.

    Reply
  24. Akrivi

    Hello from Greece,
    I have read almost everything you have written and I must say that I feel more confident about my decisions. As you may know, here in Greece we don’t have so many different brands – alternatives. I am a mother of two cat girls (Naomi- 1,5 year old and Beady- 1 year old) and a little puppy. My girls have been recently neutered and started to gain some weight that doesn’t worry me for the moment but I take into consideration. Their favorite dry food is obviously the worst (Whiskas) and from wet food they’re in love with Purina Gourmet. I’m trying to change it slowly because they become picky sometimes. I would like to know your opinion about Purina Cat Chow (they also love it ) and Farmina. I’m thinking of starting to feed with Acana or Orijen and if not so bad to give them occasionally Gourmet in order to do them a favor and not to feel so bad… Any other wet food recommendations?

    Thank you in advance for your time!

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Hello Akrivi, thank you for commenting! Purina Cat Chow doesn’t rank among our top recommendations, but Farmina appears to be among the best dry food brands on the market, perhaps ranking above Acana and Orijen in terms of reputation. As for other wet food recommendations, I’m unfortunately not very well-versed in brands sold in Greece. As long as your cats’ wet food is primarily made from animal ingredients and nutritionally complete and balanced, it should be a good choice. Sorry I wasn’t able to give more specific advice, but I hope that this helps you to feel even more confident about your choices for your two kitties.

      Best,

      Mallory

      Reply
      1. Akrivi

        Thank you very much for your help. I didn’t know that Farmina was considered to be better than Acana and Orijen. I will do my research ?.

        Reply
        1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

          Hello again, Akrivi! It looks like Optimanova is aiming to do something similar to Royal Canin by creating a line of condition-specific recipes. While doing that, they appear to be using pretty outstanding ingredients and, from what I can tell, they’re doing a good job of emphasizing fresh and dehydrated meat ingredients in their recipes. Overall, they do appear to be offering a high-quality product. That said, their foods do seem to be relatively high in carbohydrates and still aren’t ideal. It appears that at least some Farmina N&D recipes are higher in protein and may also have somewhat less carbohydrate content. I would choose one recipe from each brand that appeals to you and compare them side-by-side to determine which has the most protein from animal sources. By looking at the food’s fat and protein content, you can determine its carbohydrate content, which is probably the most important thing to consider when evaluating a dry cat food. Here’s a carbohydrate calculator that may help you make your final decision: https://felinenutritioncenter.com/

          Reply
  25. Fritz

    I’m surprised to see Natures Variety/Instinct and Weruva listed, considering both companys’ recall history.
    Thats was why we switched to Ziwi and Tiki. Although both are rather expensive and I’ve begun to distrust Tiki made in Thailand of late.
    And who knows where many of these companies source their ingredients.
    While the Nos, Smalls & Cate persons are prolly the best of the lot, they are all more expensive, by a lot, than DIY, which I’ve decided to try. I’d bet that is why those 3 and others like then have come to exist.

    Reply
  26. Pat

    Hi I have a very fussy cat that will not eat any wet canned food it has to be pouches. Can you recommend any for her? One of the recommended ones instinct for fussy cats she won’t even go near it. Help! Thanks for your time.

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Hi Pat, I would think about the qualities of the food in the pouch that make it appealing to your cat. Is it more juicy than the food in a can? Are you feeding different flavors from the pouches? Different textures? If you can identify what makes the pouched food preferable, you can find canned foods with the same qualities. Otherwise, try a gradual transition from dry to wet and consider alternatives like rehydrated freeze-dried food or a fresh homemade-style diet.

      Reply
  27. Maryann

    Hi Mallory, My vet recommended a diet that is high in fiber for my senior cat with kidney issues. But now I’m confused after learning that cats are not supposed to have carbohydrates in their diet. I just subscribed to the Smalls program because I want my cats to get more hydration from wet foot, but now I’m concerned that my cat will not be getting enough fiber given the Smalls food is mostly protein. Can you please help “de-mystify” this for me? Are cats supposed to have fiber/carbs? If so, how much? Thank you in advance for your help! -Maryann

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Hi Maryann, thank you for commenting. A high-fiber diet isn’t necessarily the same as a high-carbohydrate diet. Fiber is indigestible carbohydrate matter, and it doesn’t increase your cat’s blood sugar. In the case of a cat with kidney disease, I would prioritize managing the kidney condition over other considerations. Consultation with your veterinarian should help to clear things up.

      Reply
  28. Kea

    Hello! We have a 7 year old indoor cat that weighs just under 8 lbs. Other then throwing-up occasionally (1-3x every few days), she seems very healthy. For the past 4 or so years, we have been feeding her the following: 1/4 3 oz. can of Fancy Feast grain-free wet classic pate (in a variation of flavors) 3x a day (9a, 4:30p, and 10p) + she has 24/7 access to dry food (Rachael Ray Nutrish Indoor Complete Natural Dry Cat Food in a couple different flavors) which is stored in a food dispenser. Every Friday night, since it’s pizza night in our home, we treat her to a 1.32 oz. can of Sheba wet pate in place of her regular Fancy Feast dinner. When we first got her, we attempted to feed her much higher-quality wet food, but she refused to eat it. At that point we started feeding her Fancy Feast out of convenience and because she loved it, but went the grilled route versus pate until our vet recommended we switch to the latter. Now that she’s getting older, I’m curious about whether we should try for a better-quality food again. I’m also curious if we should be feeding her more. She seems satisfied by the amount we feed her now for the most part, but I don’t know if 2.25 oz. a day is substantial enough. Given that we’re also on a budget, what foods (wet and dry) would you recommend we try, and how much would you recommend we feed her each day? I’d also like to know your thoughts about what we’re feeding her currently, whether you consider them good, decent, or total crap options. It’s hard to know since there seem to be so many mixed reviews out there. Thanks in advance for your time/insight!

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Hi Kea, frankly, I think that what you’re feeding your cat sounds almost ideal for someone on a budget and whose cat doesn’t like some of the fancier options out there. Constant access to the Rachael Ray dry food should ensure that she never goes undernourished. And considering that she’s maintained her weight well, it sounds like it’s working well for her. As she gets older, your main consideration will probably be keeping her on a highly-digestible diet with plenty of very bioavailable protein, and this may mean switching to something that doesn’t contain animal by-products. Assuming that its phosphorus content is in line with your vet’s recommendations for kidney health, I might consider trying a freeze-dried diet for potentially-superior protein intake. This might also help with some of that chronic vomiting you’re seeing.

      Reply
  29. Paul

    Hi, I found out that some cat foods don’t contain ash, how can I calculate the carbs or DMB if I don’t see the ash? TY

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Hi Paul, unfortunately, it’s difficult to get good estimates on any of this. I generally assume roughly 3% ash for wet foods and 6% ash for dry, though, as these percentages seem to be typical. Hope this helps!

      Reply
  30. kittymeowmeow

    Hello! I was wondering what your thoughts are on the new Instinct by Natures Variety kitten frozen and freeze dried food. I have been trying to get my 7 month old to eat a raw diet but I cannot find the phosphorus % for this food and fear feeding anything with too much bone. Also, recommended amount for kittens is 2 grams per 1,000 calories of phosphorus. How much would this be on an as fed and dry matter basis? Do I just divide by 2 to find adult amount? One last thing, when checking the typical analysis of cat food, is it dry matter basis? I also have been considering Stella and Chewy boneless recipes with kitten wet food. Thank you, I was put in charge of the new kittens diet, its a stressful job! I don’t think I would have made it as a cat parent without you!

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Hi there! Sorry about the late reply. This is a great comment—you’re asking some challenging questions. So, here goes:
      1. On a very general level—just looking at the ingredient list without the added nuance of ingredient amounts and manufacturing processes—Instinct by Nature’s Variety raw and freeze-dried food for kittens looks good. I’m seeing a nice mix of muscle meat, organs, and bones, plus a nice range of additives to ensure that the food is nutritionally complete and supports healthy digestion. I think that either the freeze-dried or frozen recipe would be a great choice for a kitten.
      2. I had to contact the company, and they said that the frozen food is 1.33% phosphorus, while the freeze-dried food is 1.2% phosphorus, both on a dry matter basis. As I’ll mention later, this sounds about right for a kitten according to AAFCO guidelines.
      3. As for converting from grams/calories, it’s going to be different for every food, since they have different caloric densities. This is the calculator I use to make these types of conversions: https://vetnutrition.tufts.edu/2017/08/nutrient_converter/
      4. AAFCO’s guidelines require that an adult food is at least 0.4% phosphorus versus 1.0% for kittens (on a dry matter basis). So it’s not quite double. While I respect taking an interest in phosphorus content for the sake of being informed, in most cases, it’s probably not really necessary to know the phosphorus content if you’re buying food that is formulated for your cat’s given life stage. Yes, there are some concerns that some adult foods contain too much phosphorus as there aren’t any upper limits in AAFCO’s guidelines, and you may want to pay attention to this if you’re concerned about kidney health, but in general, commercial foods are already formulated for the nutritional requirements of the labeled life stage.
      5. Whether or not the typical analysis is on a dry matter basis depends on where you’re getting it and who you’re asking. I usually ask for a typical analysis on a dry matter basis. Otherwise, you’ll have to deal with moisture being one of the values in the analysis.
      6. A mix of adult and kitten food should be okay—I would just try to make sure that the kitten food constitutes the majority of the food.

      Hope this was helpful! Let me know if you have any more questions.

      Reply
  31. Jaime

    Hello – Because of the review of Smalls on this website AllAboutCats, I decided to try their sampler. And because of my experience with Smalls, I no longer trust reviews by AllAboutCats. AFTER placing an order for a sample at Smalls, I received a flash notification that I just agreed to a monthly auto-subscription – I did not. Furthermore there is no email confirmation of the auto-subscription terms or how to cancel, there is no account I can sign into for the terms or to cancel. I call and I receive a message that they don’t answer the phone, and to send an email. I email, telling them I do not have the not terms of the auto-subscription nor do I know how to cancel, and I have no account to sign into to learn the terms or to learn how to cancel. They respond that I should not worry, they will not place an order for me with out my consent, but then they do. I really needed to cancel because my cats hated the food. This business tactic is illegal, under the law, companies have an obligation to explain the details of the deal up front, clearly disclose any automatic renewal terms, get consumers’ express consent before billing, and offer simple ways to cancel.

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Hi Jaime, thanks for commenting. I am acutely aware of the issues that Smalls is facing and the effect that it’s had on our reputation as well. We’ve been communicating actively with Smalls to find out why they’ve been getting so many complaints, and it seems that your experience was characteristic of the system of problems that arose after a system change left customers with no customer portal. According to our contact at Smalls, your order has been canceled and you should no longer be experiencing any issues. Again, I’m sorry that we let you down with this recommendation, and we’re working on making sure that all of our reviews are up-to-date.

      Reply
  32. Kim

    Hello. Thanks for such great information! My cat was recently diagnosed with diabetes and I am looking for a better low carb alternative to the Fancy Feast pate which was suggedted by her vet. The FF seems to give her diarrhea, even with an added probiotic. I was planning to try the Weruva, which your review says is low in carbs, but your chart shows dry matter carbs as 17.06% which is very high. I’m confused!

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Hi Kim, thanks for the comment! You’re right that there was an inconsistency in this article; I’ve updated it to make things clearer. The claim of low carbohydrate content applied to the Weruva brand as a whole. Many, many Weruva recipes arequite low in carbohydrates, as you can see in the charts here. As long as you choose the right recipe, Weruva can be a good low-carb option for a diabetic cat.

      Reply
  33. Matthew

    Hello Mallory,

    Recently I did some on-line research to try to determine which canned cat foods have BPA and which do not. I quickly found information about just how bad the products of the big pet food companies are, and that their parent companies are the same large corporations that produce junk food for humans. Producing such unhealthy food for both pets and people should be illegal, however that will likely never happen. In the meantime, we just have to put in the effort to make ourselves informed of the benefits and dangers of our food, and that of our pets. I found your website to be a tremendous help in researching healthy (or at least healthier) options for my cat, so thank you very much.
    I was wondering if you had any recommendations for food that will help clean a cat’s teeth. Hill’s Prescription Diet Dental Care ( a dry food in a large kibble form) might work as claimed, however its list of ingredients is not encouraging (e.g.: chicken by-product meal, brewers rice, corn gluten meal, whole grain corn & powdered cellulose are the first five ingredients). Thanks again for the great website, it really helps in managing the enormous amount of cat food options that there are out there.

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Matthew, thanks for reaching out. My best recommendation is to feed a raw diet that includes small (again, raw) bones that your cat can chomp down on—or feeding raw treats on occasion. This will help to engage your cat’s entire mouth and may help to slough off some of the plaque that has accumulated.

      Reply
  34. Kevin

    I was feeding my cats Smalls wet food. They tolerated it, but did not love it. It arrives frozen (well, is supposed to be). One order arrived melted, they replaced shipment. Another delivery the food seemed off. I cancelled my subscription. Like the idea of human grade, but they have kinks to work out.

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Hi Beth, thank you for commenting. Unfortunately, I’ve not done enough in-depth research to give more recommendations at this time, but according to Jennifer Coates, DVM, a diet for cats with liver disease should have:

    2. High quality protein to reduce the workload on the liver
    3. Highly digestible carbohydrates
    4. High quality fats
    5. Added antioxidants such as vitamin E, vitamin C and selenium to combat oxidative stress
    6. You can learn more in this article: https://www.petmd.com/blogs/nutritionnuggets/cat/dr-coates/2014/april/feeding-cats-liver-disease-31536
      I would recommend asking your veterinarian for specific recommendations.
      Best,
      Mallory

      Reply
      1. Carley

        Have you looked into reviewing the Redford’s Naturals brand from Pet Supplies Plus? It’s the closest pet store near me and I’m looking for a budget-friendly option to add to my rotation of wet food. It’s a young brand so any info I’ve found online is mixed.

        Reply
        1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

          Hi Carley, I responded to some of your other comments, but yes, we will consider it as a future review. Redford Naturals’ wet food does look promising—some of their recipes appear to be relatively meat-focused and low-carb, so I would look at the packages at the nearby store and evaluate those ingredient lists. Hope this helps!

          Reply
  35. Beth WISEMAN

    My senior male cat has had liver failure for several years. He is all skin and bones but eats well. What food do you recommend for him to gain weight? He is eating Fancy Feast. I am trying to start him back on Hills Diet.

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Hi Beth, this is a good question. I would recommend reading our article on the best cat food for weight gain. Have you talked to a veterinarian about the best dietary options for cats with liver disease? While I would prioritize weight management, there are certain qualities that set apart foods for cats with liver disease. The appropriate food for your cat, however, will depend on his unique situation. That’s why vet consultation may be helpful.

      Reply
  36. Nico

    Hi Mallory!
    I’m a first-time mom to a 1 year old cat, who I’ve had since he was 3 weeks old. Grey’s a picky eater who had a hard time weaning off KMR at 6/7 weeks to Royal Canin Mom & Baby Kitten pate. At 6 months, I changed his food to Hill Science Kitten and he didn’t even go near it, so i changed to Royal Canin Kitten pate (next level after the mom & baby) and he refused to eat for a week until he eventually caved. Now that he’s officially 14 months, I want to transition him to an adult wet food that is great quality and not as expensive as Royal Canin ($50 for 24 cans). Currently, he eats one 3.3 oz can a day (half at 9 am, half at 6 pm), supplemented with 1/4 cup of Hill Science Indoor Kitten dry food each feeding. I’ve watched so many of your videos, read all your reviews, cross-referenced with contradicting Amazon reviews, and I’m completely overwhelmed by the options lol. I’m definitely having decision paralysis and don’t want to commit to buying a case/subscription of one brand only to have him not eat it/starve until we find the right one. I didn’t understand the cat lady stereotype until I had my own little fur baby, and now i get it. I know I’m overthinking it and that it’ll all come down to what he likes and dislikes, but can you please give me the top 4 brands of wet food that you would buy if you had a cat like Grey? I swear I’ll buy them all tonight, I desperately just want this 2-month research journey to be over and for my cat to be healthy for the next 18 years LOL.

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Hello! First off, I am so sorry about the late reply! I know you’re looking for an end to this struggle, and waiting ten days for a response was not what you were hoping for. Anyway, to jump into things without wasting any more of your time:
      My first idea is related to something you said about your experience when switching from the Mother & Babycat formula to the Kitten paté. Your kitten didn’t eat for an entire week? Did he have any treats or table scraps during that time? If so, I would look at whatever snacks or treats he enjoys and use those as guidance when choosing a diet. Monitor textural and flavor preferences as much as you can. If you don’t see a pattern, that’s fine, too! We can figure this out.
      As for top four recommendations:

      • I’m curious as to whether or not you’ve tried freeze-dried food. I think something from Stella & Chewy’s could be a very good option for you. It tends to be really palatable, and you choose the right formula, it’s relatively affordable compared to Royal Canin.
      • This option is definitely not cheap and would cost more than the Royal Canin, but you might like Caru’s human-grade stews. The quality is excellent, and I know both from experience and customer reviews that their foods are very palatable and a great option for picky cats. They also have a very soft texture that I think Grey might enjoy.
      • Smalls may be a good option for your kitty as well. We are still seeing some complaints about consistency, and I’m not 100% on whether or not they’ve ironed out the issues that were causing some of the earlier complaints around customer service, but I think you’ll be very impressed with their ingredient quality. Grey will probably like their foods, too; I’ve found that they’re very appealing to cats, and I know my cats love them. Depending on how much you order, it could either be more expensive than Royal Canin or a little bit cheaper.
      • Finally, you may want to try Nulo cat food. It’s not mentioned on this list, but they make some good canned foods that cats tend to like quite a bit. You might try their Freestyle Turkey & Chicken Recipe.

      I hope this helps! All the best to you and Grey. 🙂

      Reply
  37. Brit

    Thank you so much for your site. Do you know of any other brands like Hound & Gatos or Dr. Elsey that sell wet food for cats? I’m looking for canned food that is protein & nutrition focused at a similar price, or lower.

    Unfortunately, my cat won’t eat Hound & Gatos, no matter how healthy it is for her. She loves Dr. Elsey’s wet food, but they have been having major supply chain issues since COVID hit and it has been really difficult to get regularly. My cat was on a prescription food to rule out a medical issue, and luckily it has been ruled out, but now I don’t know what to feed her.

    Reply
    1. Brit

      After doing more digging around your site, I’m going to try Redbarn! Thank you for all your work, this site has made things so much easier. I hadn’t figured out how to sort brands by rating before, that really helped.

      Reply
  38. Rebecca G

    So much information and it is very appreciated. I currently have 3 cats ages 11, 3, and 19 months. A few years ago we started feeding science diet kibble and friskies or other similar wet food. I try to boil chicken and rice to supplement the wet food. The 2 youngest cats are new to our home 1 by rescue and 1 a very sick stray that’s now mine and getting well thanks to a great vet and lots of love! Anyways, trying to feed 3 cats strictly wet food that’s good quality is too expensive right now. I’m a student and we have 5 children. I’m just trying to find something better than friskies but with a friskies price. I’m also not sure how much each cat should be fed. And, if I can reduce the amount of wet food I need by adding boiled chicken (I can add other things also) to help up nutritional value and lower cost. I have considered feeding homemade but that is probably out of my budget.
    Thanks for any help you’re able to offer! I appreciate your time and all you do.

    Reply
  39. Roma Hanson

    I have just found this site, and hope that you can help me. I am encouraged by the many comments I have read on this post. My 11 yr old rescue kittie, Vinnie, has suddenly started to refuse food. He primarily eats wet food, but I do offer him Inception chicken dry kibble also. He has been loving Applaws chicken/duck, and he liked Royal Canin Indoor. Merrick Rabbit, and Sheba. For the past week or so, however, he doesn’t seem to have any appetite. I have now tried Stella & Chewy – he gobbled up 1 pouch of Tuna, Salmon & Mackerel, then refused the same a day later. He did have large hairball over a week ago, and following his upchucking that, I took him to vet. She ran blood tests and set all looked in normal range except for a slightly elevated thyroid level I need to bring to him in for another thyroid test in a week or so. But I don’t understand the sudden lack in food, when he always had a voracious appetite. In desperation, I opened up a small can of human tuna, and he had some, but again wouldn’t not eat any the next day. Have you any recommendations for what I might try? Or am I just overreacting?

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Hi Roma, any change in appetite is a sign that something’s changed, so I don’t really feel that you’re overreacting. I would first rule out the possibility that your cat has found a second food source (is someone in your home feeding him some tasty treats without you knowing? Is he getting outside and eating mice?). Once you’ve considered that, I would look for any behavioral changes like reduced activity or physical signs of illness like diarrhea or vomiting (aside from the hairball recently). If there aren’t any other signs of illness, I would probably take a “wait and see” approach (but I’m not a vet, and this isn’t veterinary advice!) You may appreciate veterinarian Dr. Sarah Wooten, DVM, CVJ’s video on what to do if your cat’s not eating. All the best to you and Vinnie!

      Reply
  40. Diana

    Hi,

    I noticed that in your review it says that you get 16 ounces of food from Smalls, however on their website each packet is 11.5 ounces. Is that something that was recently changed? If so, I feel like that skews the cost per day significantly and Smalls ends up costing a lot.

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Hi Diana, that’s a good observation! I’ve ordered a new batch of Smalls and will be doing a complete update of our Smalls cat food review soon to reflect any changes in pricing. For now, the change in packet size should not have that great of an effect because your payment is not calculated based on package size but how much you order and how frequently your shipments come in.

      Reply
  41. Carolyn

    I tried Cat Person as well as Smalls. My kitty won’t eat either one!!! I love the equipment they send each provide to keep food fresh and easier to serve and I would have liked to continue with either of them, but I can’t get my boy to eat wet food lately. If anyone has advice on a healthy, and widely-known liked food by picky kitties, please let me know.

    Reply
  42. Nancy

    Hello. Mallory. I appreciate your efforts in researching cat food and educating cat people, plus your conscientiousness in responding to comments. I have been feeding Authority canned food, the Petsmart brand, to my cat, Javy. I chose this food because it is affordable (I’m on a limited income), you gave it a good review last year, plus it is not grain free. My vet does not recommend grain-free food because research suggests it causes heart problems. She said it is not known whether it is the lack of grains that cause this condition or whether it’s the ingredients used to replace the grains. Although current research is not conclusive, I’ve made the decision to feed Javy canned food that is not grain free. Unfortunately, I am having problems buying Authority on a regular basis. As of today, it is not available through the Petsmart website nor the two Petsmart stores in our city. Is there a canned brand you can recommend that is both affordable and not grain free? I appreciate any guidance you can provide. Thank you!

    Reply
  43. Victoria

    Hi! I was wondering if you could give some advice about what I could cook/prep vs buying canned food?

    Thanks so much for all your hard work and dedication, this site is awesome!

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Hi Victoria, I’m so sorry about the delayed response! You might appreciate our article going over all the details on homemade cat food, including some pros and cons comparing it to commercial food. If you decide to make homemade food, refer to this article—it also gives several homemade recipes for you to reference.

      Reply
  44. Debi

    My cat has a chicken allergy. Looking for a good canned wet catfood that is pate & does not hace chicken in it. Alot of beef canned food still has chicken in it!!!!

    Reply
  45. Julie S.

    Hi Mallory.

    We’re considering transitioning our two cats from dry Tuscan Naturals food to a wet food for at least one meal a day, so I’m reading reviews to find a reasonably-priced option. I read this article and “The 5 Best Cheap Cat Foods that are Affordable and Healthy” and found a confusing inconsistency: In this article, you list Authority Chicken Entree Adult Pate as the “Best Budget” choice. However, in the other article, your top pick is Wholehearted Grain Free Chicken Recipe Flaked in Gravy. Is one clearly better, in terms of ingredient quality and species-appropriateness?

    Thanks!

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Hi Julie, the article on the best cheap cat food is a bit outdated—we’re currently working on an update that will make the two articles consistent. We’ve learned that the WholeHearted food has higher carbohydrate content than thought initially, and it shouldn’t be ranked as highly as it is in that article. I would lean towards the Authority food over the WholeHearted product. You can also consider wet food from Nulo, which isn’t mentioned on either list currently and has a lot of excellent qualities for a low price. Thanks for the comment!

      Reply
  46. Carole Hayes

    Hi! Found your cat food reviews recently and am SO grateful to you for doing this!

    Could you please do a review of Amazon’s KITZY brand? (the ingredient list looks pretty good to me, but I know there’s a lot more that you look at…)

    Reply
  47. Chris

    Out of curiosity, why is Feline Natural now not even in the top ten after previously being the number one recommendation? I see on the product review page that its biggest dings are from the parent company recall history and affordability. It looks like the recall issue is a one-time incident from 2018, which would have been considered in the original review. Did you change how heavily you weigh these two factors, or did something else happen (e.g. did the price increase significantly)?

    I am asking because I’m not a fan of the peas in smalls or having to deal with frozen food. I have been feeding Ziwi Peak for a few years, but with the recent sale of the company, they are discontinuing the provenance line, which are the only formulations that don’t have chickpeas. My cats are not thrilled about the recipes containing chickpeas, and neither am I. I’m also frankly tired of all the fluctuations in price and product availability over the past year, although perhaps that has impacted all brands given supply chain and inflation issues. I’m fortunate that right now I can afford pricey cat food, and want to get the most species-appropriate recipe for my two healthy 3-year-old cats. It seems like Feline Natural fits the bill, but would like to know if I’m missing something important given its fall in your ratings.

    Thank you for all of this amazing research that you do. I’ve found it tremendously helpful as a first-time cat parent.

    Reply
    1. kateKate Barrington

      Hi Chris! We tend to rotate products in and out of these “top 10” style round-ups simply because there are so many brands worth recommending. Sometimes it does have something to do with a new recall or other concerns with the company but I don’t believe that was the case with Feline Natural. Feline Natural is still a personal favorite of mine and it’s still one of our more highly rated brands overall – we just chose to highlight a few others here for one reason or another.
      Also, I feel the same way about peas and chickpeas in cat food, so it’s disappointing to hear that Ziwi is discontinuing the Provenance line! I’m glad you’re able to afford the best for your cat, however, and applaud you for putting so much thought into feeding your cat well!

      Reply
  48. Chris

    Hi! I posted a question about Feline Natural a day or two ago, but the comment seems to be gone now. Was it removed for some reason or did something just go wonky with the comments section? Thank you for all of this research you do, it is very helpful!

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Hey Chris, I can see your comment and Kate’s response to it—not sure what happened in between there, but everything should be fine now. I will add to Kate’s reply and say that the specific reason Feline Natural was removed from the list was availability issues. It was becoming hard to find it available through our usual retailers, so it was removed.

      Reply
  49. Avatar photoLanza

    The price for Cat Person is incorrect. They sell Pack of five 2.75 oz cups at a price of $9.50. A normal size cat will approximately need 2-3 cups per day. Their daily price should be about $3.8-$5.7.

    Reply
    1. Melanie

      Hello, I am a mother of 2 4-year-old Persian cats. I am currently giving them Royal Canin Persian but I am concerned about the ingredients list. We live in Mexico and it is a very popular brand that all veterinarians recommend. Could you recommend the best food for them, both dry and wet. I’m not worried about the cost. just not grain-free because they are very thin. thanks a lot

      Reply
  50. Chloe

    I just want to say thank you Mallory! I have been consulting your site since first adopting my kitten. I came right back when deciding on which adult cat food to feed him- and he loves the Hounds & Gatos! All of your efforts are so appreciated!

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Hi Chloe, thank you for stopping by and letting me know! I’m really glad to hear that you’ve referred to All About Cats to help you choose the right adult food for your cat, and it’s great to know that he likes Hound & Gatos. All the best to you and your cat!

      Reply
  51. Hana

    I have been using Smalls for about a year now and love giving my cat food that didn’t have fillers. I order a lot of meal kits (for people) so was familiar with the subscription model, which seems to be a complaint many people have. I recently had an issue where I pushed back an order, but was still charged and am dealing with it. However, I am much more concerned about thread worms, which is the reason why I pushed back the order. My cat has them, and they are rare apparently. The vet said they are not spread via feces the way other worms are, but by eating raw or under-cooked animals / food.
    I love the idea of Smalls, but the quality has been inconsistent. I usually have old packets left in the freezer when a new box arrives so can easily compare between batches. I have gotten batches that were much darker and smelled burnt (though cat seemed fine with them so I didn’t complain). I have also gotten “smooth” bird that was very chunky and “ground” bird that was pate-like. Again, cat didn’t seem to mind, so I never complained. However, if they can overcook / burn food, I am concerned they can under-cook food, too, resulting in thread worms. Any suggestions on getting more information? Thank you.

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Hana, thank you so much for the thoughtful comment. I have to ask about your vet’s expertise because cats do not get infected with threadworms (also known as pinworms). Additionally, it is quite normal for cats to get worms from raw meat, especially from wild animals. Is Smalls the only food you’ve given your cat? Does your cat ever go outside? Is it possible that your cat ate a mouse or other animal that could have given her the worms? Has she ever had a flea infestation? This is also a common source of worms. The meats we feed our cats, even if uncooked, very rarely are contaminated with worms.
      Thank you again for asking about this, and I’ll be in touch. Feel free to email me at [email protected] if you’d like to keep the conversation going.

      – Mallory

      Reply
  52. Tammy Skinner

    Hi, I have a 6-year-old man Coon that was brought up on friskies dried cat food. After looking at the ingredients I slowly switched her to Blue Buffalo and she loves it. She will not eat wet cat food she will only lick the gravy off of it. I want her to have whatever is best for her, please help me I do not want to lose her and I very much want what is best for her. Thank you very much.

    Reply
    1. Tammy Skinner

      Hello, I was given a Maine Coon female cat and she is 6 years old. Her previous owner fed her meow mix, and I wanted baby on a much better diet. So I weaned her off and put her on Blue Buffalo. After reading several articles I’m concerned about giving it to her. I’ve tried wet food and she only licks up the gravy but does not eat the food. She does eat the dry food kibbles. I really want her to be on a good diet and would really like to know what you would advise. I cannot afford super expensive foods, but if I could find foods to implement with her Blue Buffalo that would be great. Again I’ve not been seeing too many good things about Blue Buffalo, so what would you suggest please? Also is baby considered a senior at 6 years old?

      Reply
  53. Julie

    I’m not sure who you’re calculating Price per Day. When I click the links you give to buy the products on Amazon, the price per day is more than double – unless cats are only meant to have one 5 oz can per day. Am I missing something?

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Hi Julie, we base these numbers on feeding 200 calories per day—I believe the discrepancy you’re seeing is the result of inflation over the last year. We’ll check and update. Thank you!

      Reply
  54. Pepper Hume

    Wow! I just found this site and read thru the entire Question and Responses page. I have bookmarked it.
    For now: My 12# Maine coon mix was a rescue, so his age is estimated about 10. He gets very insecure when his kibble bowl is not full but also demands wet food twice a day. Yet he won’t eat more than a tablespoon of it so even a 3 oz. can of Fancy Feast lasts us days! He prefers minced/shreds in gravy but I have yet to figure out if he prefers fish or poultry. His vet put him on Royal Canin Urinary Adult dry food last year. When she advised against treats for our daily game of catch, he readily accepted leftover Purina Cat Chow kibble! He refused all hairball supplements, so I substituted maybe a tablespoon of Purina One Hairball Formula kibble for the game. Doesn’t matter what I toss him, it’s the game he loves.

    Hairballs were radically minimized this summer, but he still vomits. Sometimes it’s virtually whole unchewed kibbles as tho he simply ate too fast. he seems perfectly healthy otherwise, litterbox habits look good.

    So, I think I need to try changing his wet food. ?? I keep him indoors.

    Reply
  55. nasrin

    Hello,

    I recently noticed that Ziwi Peak has not made it to the list this year and on other categories on best canned food.
    Is It due to change of ingredients? Just curious cause I give my mainecoon ziwipeak canned food. However, I am debating to change to Tiki Cat.

    Reply
    1. kateKate Barrington

      Hi Nasrin! We really like Ziwi Peak as a brand and have included it in many lists throughout the year. Unfortunately, the brand has been sold out a lot online recently and we try to keep our lists updated to ensure that the products we’re recommending are actually available for purchase. If you’re able to still find Ziwi Peak and your cat still enjoys it, there’s no reason to make the switch. We do, however, also recommend Tiki Cat if that brand is easier for you to find!

      Reply
  56. Rebecca

    Hi, I noticed you have a best for kittens wet food option different than the one in the post about kitten foods. Why is that and which one is actually better? So far I’ve tried instinct original kitten, wellness classic core Turkey and chicken liver, blue wilderness (which I don’t think you recommended but they seem to really like) and the nulo one that’s recommended here. So far they don’t seem to like that one much at all—that actually refused it the second time and held out for something else. I want to be sure I’m giving them what they need, but I’m so confused by all the options. My previous cat was a special diet boy (hydrolyzed only) so I haven’t really had to figure this out in over a decade.
    Thanks in advance, and thank you for the information provided on this site. It’s very helpful, even if I’m still confused.

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Hi Rebecca, it makes perfect sense that you’d be confused. I believe we changed to the Nulo recipe because another Wellness CORE recipe was shifted into the “best paté” position, and the choice was primarily based on what would make sense presentationally rather than just the nutritional merit of the recipes. In fact, when I first wrote this article, the Wellness CORE recipe listed on the best kitten food article was recommended as the best kitten food. I’m going to ask to have this article changed up again, because the order and labels don’t quite make sense to me anymore, either. Apologies for all of the weirdness!

      Reply
  57. Cosmin

    Hello. What do you think about Schesir Bio ? Think you’ll ever do a review on it ? I live in Europe and most of the brands on your blog are not accessible here. I really appreciate your work, I recently changed my cat’s food from Hill’s to Carnilove based on what I learned from you and it’s great ! Thank you very much !

    Reply
  58. Marco

    Hi ! Can you please consider to make a review of Zooplus Bio and Yarrah brands ? They both state that their products are organic. Thank you !!!

    Reply
  59. Cris

    Hi there!
    I’ve been researching European wet cat foods (as I’m from Europe and it’s harder/more expensive to buy your top wet foods) and I’ve come across Rosie’s farm, Greenwoods Joy and Purizon which are all from the same mother company, they’re sold online on zooplus. I’d love to see a review on the first two from you since there’s a Purizon review already, if possible? I’ve emailed their website asking about binders/thickeners as I’m a bit concerned on that matter. The pet food industry is truly frustrating.
    Thanks for your hard work.

    Reply
  60. Vera

    Hello, Your site is very informative and helpful.
    I would appreciate if you could find out as to what happened to Boreal wet canned cat food. All they seem to sell is all fish recipes. They used to have chicken, turkey, duck, lamb, beef.
    Even a couple of nearby pet stores (Ruffins/Global) are unable to get these recipes from Boreal for almost two years now. My cat is allergic to fish. But did so well with the other recipes. Thank you, for your help.

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Hi Vera, thanks for the comment. I called Boreal, and a representative explained that they’ve had supply issues for a couple of years, and there’s no real end in sight, unfortunately. I hope you can find an alternative that works as well as those Boreal recipes did for you.

      Reply
  61. Heather

    Hi Mallory,
    I’m wondering why Ziwi Peak and Feline Natural did not make your 2023 list of best wet cat foods (I know they’ve been at the top the last several years.) Did something change recently?
    Thanks,
    Heather

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Hi Heather! Ziwi cat food was out of stock for extended periods over the last year, so we replaced it with more reliably-available brands on numerous product roundups. Hope this helps!

      Reply
  62. Karen

    Please check the latest reviews on Chewy.com regarding a recipe change for the chicken and turkey recipes and foods being manufactured in Ecuador. Disappointed Jan. 2023 had a cat illness because of the change in the chicken and did not have a good customer relations experience. Many describe the consistency as very watery. This is a concern for a highly rated brand.

    Reply
  63. Leanne

    Hi Mallory, been utilizing your website for a few years now, thanks for all you do! I was looking for a new wet food because I realized that Instinct is now using guar gum in their pate recipes, and I had been feeding it for a while based on it being gum free. I noticed that your stated ingredients on the 10 best list don’t show this recipe change. Here’s the ingredients of the chicken pate via your link to Chewy: Ingredients
    Chicken, Chicken Broth, Chicken Liver, Egg Product, Dicalcium Phosphate, Turkey, Peas, Carrots, Pumpkin, Tomato, Kale, Cabbage, Ground Flaxseed, Tuna Fish Oil, Guar Gum, Broccoli, Potassium Chloride, Cranberries, Blueberries, Salt, Parsley, Taurine, Minerals (Zinc Proteinate, Magnesium Proteinate, Copper Proteinate, Manganese Proteinate, Iron Proteinate), Choline Chloride, Vitamins (L-Ascorbyl-2-Polyphosphate, Vitamin E Supplement, Thiamine Mononitrate, Riboflavin Supplement, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride, Vitamin D Supplement, Folic Acid, Vitamin B12 Supplement).

    Reply
      1. Ken Ryder

        Do not give your cats tap water, tap water contains minerals and other stuff that can be bad for you cats. Special Kitty is harmful to your cats as the ingrediants can be harmful to them. Even though it is a cheap version of food, the ingrediants are bad for them. I have lost 2 cats due to this. I’m not sure how they are still in business,.

        Reply
  64. Berj

    Hello Team! What are your thoughts on the Salmon & Mackerel version of Nulo Freestyle canned wet food?

    In your review of the Nulo wet cat food, your team spoke highly of the “Turkey & Chicken” recipe but wanted to get the team’s thoughts on the Salmon & Mackerel” recipe as my cats prefer that one. Thank you so much!!

    Reply
    1. small mallory photoMallory Crusta Post author

      Hi! The overall quality is about the same—my only hesitation around fish-based foods is the increased likelihood of heavy metal contamination. It’s fine if your cats like it, but perhaps you can incorporate it as part of a rotation with other foods in the mix as well.

      Reply
  65. Megan

    Most of wet food has many fish ingredients, is it safe to feed the wet food for cats everyday? I reached out to many manufacturers, they replied unclear answer like our food is below maximum tolerable limits.

    Reply
  66. Elizabeth Grant

    Why don’t you list NON-GMO wet cat food? Yes that’s Tiki but many on this list have GMO’s. They play games and say ‘some’ of the food is listed as non-GMO. I want NO GMO’s like I had when TJ’s had wet cat food.

    I’m looking to find a ‘somewhat’ reasonably priced Non-GMO wet cat food that does not have mercury high fish? NO tuna, No tilapia.

    Please focus on what is the most important – the health of our beautiful pets.

    Reply
  67. Carlotta

    Next time you do testing please include the best mousse wet catfood. Please include nulo , tiki cat dark and nutrition recipe in this testing I am currently feeding Tiki cat dark mousse to my Cassie kitty with IBS. She loves it.

    Reply
  68. Richard

    I bought chicken and turkey this week for $1.99 per pound, which comparatively speaking, works out to 12.5 cents per ounce. Far less than the prices I’m seeing here. Would there be a problem with feeding my cats ‘people food’ such as this? I’m sure there would also need to be some kind of other nutritional sources combined, but it does seem like a far more reasonable solution. Please let me know what you think about this option and maybe point me to where I can find more info on putting together a ‘people’s food’ diet for my pets. Thanks.

    Reply
  69. Stacey

    Question. Is it best to just stick with one brand of these top wet foods you recommend? Or can you get 2-3 brands and alternate with feeding. How would that work if so. Feed one brand for a week and switch to another brand, or would you do one month then switch? Or just stick with one. I am leaning towards the Rawz brand and the Weruva

    Reply
    1. kateKate Barrington

      Great question, Stacey! You can certainly rotate between different products, but it’s important to transition your cat from one to the next to avoid digestive upset. Once they’re used to the food, however, a later swap might be more easily tolerated. I think you can try different methods and see what works for your cat. I personally use one product as a staple diet and offer a different one at one meal per day.

      Reply
  70. NancyFollett

    The fussy cat chicken, golden wet food is disgusting. I bought it for my cats. They wouldn’t touch it. I felt the chicken it was gross. It was rough. It felt horrible. I ended up throwing it away. I wouldn’t have fed that to my cats. I feed a lot of fussy cat to my cat, but that was just disgusting, I’m sorry I went with your suggestion that that was a good cat food wet. It is just gross. The chicken was all dry and it felt like it was a mechanically cut. I just can’t tell you how disgusting it was.

    Reply
  71. Linda Kenney

    Thank you for this list. I am currently feeding Ziwipeak . However I found out that this brand is very high in phosphorus, so I am looking for a nutritional food, made in the US or New Zealand, that is not high in phosphorus. Are any of these foods low in phosphorus?

    Reply
    1. kateKate Barrington

      Hi Linda! Freeze-dried food does tend to be high in phosphorus when it contains significant amounts of raw bone. Has your cat been diagnosed with kidney disease? If so, the stage of kidney disease may dictate what level of phosphorus they can tolerate (prescription foods are the lowest, but some non-Rx options have restricted phosphorus levels). We have a roundup of low-phosphorus foods for cats with kidney disease here: https://cats.com/best-cat-food-for-kidney-disease

      Reply